7

I need this tall QED symbol. Yes, need.

Tall QED

Here is an MWE, since my question was too short to meet quality standards.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\begin{document}

\noindent In view of the choice we made for the orientation of $\partial D$, we conclude that 
\[\int_{\partial \mathbf{D}} \iota^*\omega = 
(-1)^n \int_{\mathbb{R}^{n-1}} a_n(\cdot,\cdot, \dots, \cdot, 0).\]
This completes the proof of the theorem. $\square$

\end{document}

Obviously the square should be replaced with the tall QED symbol. Thanks.

  • Just out of curiosity: I usually use \square or \blacksquare. Why do you need the tall one? Is the tall one common in you context? Which context is that? Is there a difference in meaning? – Martin Thoma Jan 12 '15 at 7:04
  • @moose -- this looks to me like an attempt to reproduce a historical document. this style was typical in the late 1800s and early 1900s. – barbara beeton Jan 12 '15 at 14:08
  • 1
    I just prefer the style, I was joking about needing it. And the book is from the late 60s. – Randy Randerson Jan 12 '15 at 16:28
  • {\setlength\fboxsep{0pt}\fbox{\phantom{l}}} (screenshot) – Henri Menke Jul 6 '18 at 6:00
7

Here, I just scaled the \square in the vertical direction by a factor of 1.5 times the width, and called it \tallqed. The \smash prevents it from affecting line spacing. EDITED to reduce size. Note that first argument of \scalebox is the horizontal scaling, while 2nd (optional) argument is the vertical scaling. These can be adjusted to suit.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb,graphicx}
\def\tallqed{\smash{\scalebox{.75}[1.125]{$\square$}}}
\begin{document}

\noindent In view of the choice we made for the orientation of $\partial D$, we conclude that 
\[\int_{\partial \mathbf{D}} \iota^*\omega = 
(-1)^n \int_{\mathbb{R}^{n-1}} a_n(\cdot,\cdot, \dots, \cdot, 0).\]
This completes the proof of the theorem. \tallqed
\end{document}

enter image description here

WChargin correctly points out that the symbol stretch makes the box border thickness non-uniform on the sides compared with the top/bottom. If that is an issue, the problem can be remedied with a slightly altered definition, by \ooaligning two of the stretched \squares with a slight kern.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb,graphicx}
\def\tallqedX{\smash{\scalebox{.75}[1.125]{$\square$}}}
\def\tallqed{\ooalign{\tallqedX\cr\kern.2pt\tallqedX}}
\begin{document}

\noindent In view of the choice we made for the orientation of $\partial D$, we conclude that 
\[\int_{\partial \mathbf{D}} \iota^*\omega = 
(-1)^n \int_{\mathbb{R}^{n-1}} a_n(\cdot,\cdot, \dots, \cdot, 0).\]
This completes the proof of the theorem. \tallqed
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • It's too tall; I think 0.6/1.0 is fine, though. – Randy Randerson Jan 11 '15 at 19:52
  • @fctaylor25 I agree, and I have scaled it back. – Steven B. Segletes Jan 11 '15 at 19:54
  • @fctaylor25 Sorry, I was editing to explain how scaling can be tailored (or fctaylor'ed) to suit. – Steven B. Segletes Jan 11 '15 at 19:56
  • But this makes the top and bottom borders of the box heavier than the left and right borders. See a zoomed-in image here. – wchargin Jan 12 '15 at 3:18
  • @WChargin True, but if that is an issue, it can be remedied with something akin to \def\tallqedX{\smash{\scalebox{.75}[1.125]{$\square$}}}\def\tallqed{\ooalign{\tallqedX\cr\kern.2pt\tallqedX}}. – Steven B. Segletes Jan 12 '15 at 3:29
7

I'd use amsthm and its automatic \qed feature. But if you want, you can use \tallopenbox by itself.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amssymb,amsthm}

\newcommand{\tallopenbox}{\leavevmode
  \hbox to.4em{%
  \hfil\vrule
  \vbox to.8em{\hrule width.3em\vfil\hrule}%
  \vrule\hfil}}
\renewcommand{\qedsymbol}{\tallopenbox}


\begin{document}

\begin{proof}
In view of the choice we made for the orientation of $\partial D$, we conclude that
\[
\int_{\partial \mathbf{D}} \iota^*\omega =
(-1)^n \int_{\mathbb{R}^{n-1}} a_n(\cdot,\cdot, \dots, \cdot, 0).
\]
This completes the proof of the theorem.
\end{proof}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Modify the height (here 0.8em) and the width (here 0.4em); the inner width (here .3em) should a little smaller than the outer width.

2

As a simple alternative to scaling the \square, consider employing a \framebox with a \phantom symbol:

\def\tallqed{\setlength{\fboxsep}{-\fboxrule}\framebox{\phantom{t}}}

You could customize the box thickness by adding, e.g., \setlength{\fboxrule}{.3pt} or pick another phantom symbol for adjusting the box size.

0

Draw it manually:

\def\tallqed{\hbox{\rlap{\hbox{\vrule height 3mm width 0.1mm \hskip 1mm \vrule height 3mm width 0.1mm}}{\vbox
{\hrule height 0.1mm width 1.2mm \vskip 2.8mm \hrule height 0.1mm width 1.2mm}}}}    % tall q.e.d.

This completes the proof of the theorem. \hfill \tallqed

enter image description here

0

The STIX font defines the mathemtical symbol \vrectangle.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{stix}
\begin{document}

$\vrectangle$

\end{document}

enter image description here

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