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I have been extensively using LaTeX for technical documentation. To make drawings I often use inkscape and then convert them to .pdf. I was wondering, are there any plan in LaTeX community to natively support the SVG format?

I saw there is a possibility to include the SVG package. I did not try it but as I understood from manual it does exactly the same thing as I do: it calls inkscape, converts svg->pdf and includes the resulting image via pdflatex. I don't see any added value in that, as this only makes the document compilation longer and more complex.

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    Welcome to TeX.SX! – Paul Gessler Jan 13 '15 at 13:18
  • You mean, the possibility to write something like \begin{svg}\rect{x="10" y="10" height="100" width="100" style="stroke:#ff0000; fill: #0000ff"}\end{svg} and get a picture? That would be great! – Clément Jan 13 '15 at 13:40
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    tikz uses a tex rather than than svg/xml syntax but implements many of the drawing primitives found in svg, bezier curves, fills, gradients etc – David Carlisle Jan 13 '15 at 13:56
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    I think the question is asking about being able to do \includegraphics{<existing svg filename>} just as we do for .jpg, .png, .eps, etc. today. – Paul Gessler Jan 13 '15 at 13:59
  • There is svg package, if you mean... – user11232 Jan 13 '15 at 15:09
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Short answer I think is "no" there are no plans.

Over the years there have been several requests for different formats, notably gif images and EPS. However given that the end result has to be a PDF stream including any new format essentially means linking some xxx-to-pdf conversion library into the pdftex executable which makes it bigger and harder to maintain and doesn't really add much real functionality as, as you comment, you can do the conversion from a wide array of formats externally, targeting pdf for vector formats or png for bitmap.

As an alternative to conversion from SVG you could look to generating the relevant PDF drawing operators directly in TeX, which is basically what the tikz/pgf code is doing.

tikz uses a tex rather than than svg/xml syntax but implements many of the drawing primitives found in svg, bezier curves, fills, gradients etc..

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