3

Suppose I had the following;

\begin{table}
\centering
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{Table1}  \\ \hline
A very long equation with k as input & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -19.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -16.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -13.3349 \\ \hline
4 & -11.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -10.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -9.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -6.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
\quad
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{table2}  \\ \hline
A very long equation with k as input & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -16.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -12.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -9.5532 \\ \hline
4 & -5.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -4.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -3.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -3.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
\quad
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{table3}  \\ \hline
A very long equation with k as input & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -5.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -2.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -3.3349 \\ \hline
4 & -1.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -1.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -1.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -1.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
\end{table}

Notice how the first columns only have small entries (At most they will have 8 figures), I was wondering what I could insert in this to make it so that that the title of column 1 (the long equation with k as input) would split into more than one row - whilst remaining centred.

Thanks - and apologies if this has already been answered, Rob.

EDIT: The end idea is to ensure all tables are next to one another on the same row.

6

You can load array package and declare a new column type

\newcolumntype{C}{@{}>{\Centering\arraybackslash}m{0.14\linewidth}}

with suitable value for 0.14 in 0.14\linewidth. I have used \Centering command from ragged2e package inside the column. Also you will need [t] for tabular as in

 \begin{tabular}[t]{|C|c|}

MWE

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,array,ragged2e}
\newcolumntype{C}{>{\Centering\arraybackslash}m{0.14\linewidth}}
\begin{document}
  \begin{table}
\centering
\begin{tabular}[t]{|C|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{Table1}  \\ \hline
A very long equation with k as input & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -19.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -16.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -13.3349 \\ \hline
4 & -11.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -10.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -9.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -6.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
%\quad
\begin{tabular}[t]{|C|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{table2}  \\ \hline
A very long equation with k as input & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -16.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -12.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -9.5532 \\ \hline
4 & -5.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -4.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -3.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -3.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
%\quad
\begin{tabular}[t]{|C|c|}
\hline
\multicolumn{2}{|c|}{table3}  \\ \hline
$a+b+f+c+d+g+t+r+e+y+u+h+g+b+u+y+u+r+t+y=Z$ & Answer \\ \hline
1 & -5.0123  \\ \hline
2 & -2.4377 \\ \hline
3 & -3.3349 \\ \hline
4 & -1.7427  \\ \hline
5 & -1.1329 \\ \hline
6  & -1.0075 \\ \hline
7 & -1.0001 \\ \hline
\end{tabular}
\end{table}
\end{document}

enter image description here

Following the tradition of the site, vertical lines are evil and a table that uses booktabs is neat, here is a booktabs version:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,array,ragged2e,booktabs}
\newcolumntype{C}{>{\Centering\arraybackslash}m{0.17\linewidth}}
\begin{document}
\begin{table}
\centering
\begin{tabular}[t]{CcCcCc}
\toprule
\multicolumn{2}{c}{Table1} & \multicolumn{2}{c}{table2} & \multicolumn{2}{c}{table3}  \\ \midrule
A very long equation with k as input & Answer & A very long equation with k as input & Answer & A very long equation with k as input & Answer  \\ \cmidrule(lr){1-2}\cmidrule(lr){3-4}\cmidrule(lr){5-6}
1 & -19.0123 &  1 & -16.0123 & 1 & -5.0123  \\
2 & -16.4377 &  2 & -12.4377 & 2 & -2.4377 \\
3 & -13.3349 &  3 & -9.5532  & 3 & -3.3349 \\
4 & -11.7427 &  4 & -5.7427  & 4 & -1.7427  \\
5 & -10.1329 &  5 & -4.1329  & 5 & -1.1329 \\
6 & -9.0075  &  6 & -3.0075  & 6 & -1.0075 \\
7 & -6.0001  &  7 & -3.0001  & 7 & -1.0001 \\\bottomrule
\end{tabular}
\end{table}
\end{document}

enter image description here

In the above tables, the number should have been in math mode (see the minus sign). To do that you can define another new column like

\newcolumntype{P}{>{$}c<{$}}

and use it as

\begin{tabular}[t]{CPCPCP}

Or.... use siunitx and its S column type:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,array,ragged2e,booktabs,siunitx}
\newcolumntype{C}{>{\Centering\arraybackslash}m{0.17\linewidth}}
\newcolumntype{P}{S[table-format=3.4]}
\newcommand{\mc}[1]{\multicolumn{1}{c}{#1}}
\begin{document}
\begin{table}
\centering
\begin{tabular}[t]{CPCPCP}
\toprule
\multicolumn{2}{c}{Table1} & \multicolumn{2}{c}{table2} & \multicolumn{2}{c}{table3}  \\ \midrule
A very long equation with k as input & \mc{Answer} & A very long equation with k as input & \mc{Answer} & A very long equation with k as input & \mc{Answer}  \\ \cmidrule(lr){1-2}\cmidrule(lr){3-4}\cmidrule(lr){5-6}
1 & -19.0123 &  1 & -16.0123 & 1 & -5.0123  \\
2 & -16.4377 &  2 & -12.4377 & 2 & -2.4377 \\
3 & -13.3349 &  3 & -9.5532  & 3 & -3.3349 \\
4 & -11.7427 &  4 & -5.7427  & 4 & -1.7427  \\
5 & -10.1329 &  5 & -4.1329  & 5 & -1.1329 \\
6 & -9.0075  &  6 & -3.0075  & 6 & -1.0075 \\
7 & -6.0001  &  7 & -3.0001  & 7 & -1.0001 \\\bottomrule
\end{tabular}
\end{table}
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • @mrhappysmile I have added some more which may be of interest to you. – user11232 Feb 8 '15 at 15:48
2

You should consider using booktabs and ommit vertical lines, if you want to separate the tables, you could use subtable environments of subcaption:

\documentclass{scrartcl}

\usepackage{booktabs}
\usepackage[width=0.9\linewidth,labelfont=bf]{caption}
\usepackage{subcaption}

\begin{document}

\begin{table}
  \centering
  \caption{Three equations evaluated at $k$}
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{c c}
      \toprule
      $k$ & Result \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{c c}
      \toprule
      $k$ & Result \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{c c}
      \toprule
      $k$ & Result \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
\end{table}

\end{document}

output

I think you should also consider tou round the values, are 4 digits meaningfull and necessary? And You could use the S columntype of siunitx to get the numbers properly aligned at the decimal point (Note the Braces around the titles):

\documentclass{scrartcl}

\usepackage{booktabs}
\usepackage[width=0.9\linewidth,labelfont=bf]{caption}
\usepackage{subcaption}

\usepackage{siunitx}

\begin{document}
\pagestyle{empty}

\begin{table}
  \centering
  \caption{Three equations evaluated at $k$}
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{S[table-format=1.0] S[table-format=-2.4]}
      \toprule
      {$k$} & {Result} \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{S[table-format=1.0] S[table-format=-2.4]}
      \toprule
      {$k$} & {Result} \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
  \begin{subtable}{0.33\textwidth}
    \centering
    \caption{Complicated function of $k$}
    \begin{tabular}{S[table-format=1.0] S[table-format=-2.4]}
      \toprule
      {$k$} & {Result} \\
      \midrule
      1 & -19.0123  \\
      2 & -16.4377 \\
      3 & -13.3349 \\
      4 & -11.7427  \\
      5 & -10.1329 \\
      6  & -9.0075 \\ 
      7 & -6.0001 \\ 
      \bottomrule
    \end{tabular}
  \end{subtable}%  
\end{table}
\end{document}

outout II

You should also note that siunitx uses the correct minus sign, not a hyphen, and uses the monospaced figures.

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