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What are the LaTeX commands equivalents of MS Word Styles. I am looking for the commands for the following commonly used basic MS Word Styles:

  1. Headings (Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3)
  2. Lists (bullets, numbered lists, multilevel lists. with all the various list types displayed in the dropdowns of these lists in the MS Word Ribbon)
  3. Indentations (shown in the MS Word Ribbon)
  4. Fonts (font names/types displayed in the Font dropdown in MS Word, and the Font sizes)
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    Please clarify: do you want sectioning commands which produces results that look like Word ones or do you want to know the sectioning commands themselves? – Astrinus Feb 12 '15 at 18:58
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    1. \section / \subsection etc.; 2. itemize / enumerate environments; 3. indentation is automatic in LaTeX, for manual adjustment, see commands in geometry / setspace packages; 4. for fonts, see tug.dk/FontCatalogue – Herr K. Feb 12 '15 at 18:58
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    re fonts: fontspec (can only be used with Xe(La)TeX or Lua(La)TeX). For another type of indentation, see tex.stackexchange.com/q/588/17423. – Sean Allred Feb 12 '15 at 19:13
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    I would also like to go on record saying that Word's 'styles' are a poor imitation of LaTeX's macros/environments rather than the other way around. – Sean Allred Feb 12 '15 at 19:14
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    Personally, i consider this a bad question. It is more than one, which isn't really the format of the site. Additionally, this seems all to be touched in every LaTeX introduction, no matter how good or bad it is. Or is you question, what the equivalent to MSWord styles is, which would be macros/control sequences? – Johannes_B Feb 12 '15 at 19:53
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  1. Headings (Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3)
  • \section{title}
  • \subsection{title}
  • \paragraph{title}
  • \subparagraph{title}

You can define others as necessary/appropriate, but I'd caution you against making the document structure too deep.

  1. Lists (bullets, numbered lists, multilevel lists. with all the various list types displayed in the dropdowns of these lists in the MS Word Ribbon)

Use the {itemize} environment for bulleted lists; {enumerate} for numbered lists. If you want to have a multi-level list, just start another environment within the original:

\begin{itemize}
  \item thing one
  \item
    \begin{enumerate}
      \item thing two a
      \item thing two b
    \end{enumerate}
  \item thing three
    \begin{enumerate}
      \item thing three a
      \item thing three b
    \end{enumerate}
  \item one more thing!
\end{itemize}

For custom item indicators, check out the enumerate package or the more powerful enumitem package. (The latter makes it easy to define entirely new types of lists. This is good for semantic markup.) If there is some symbol that you don't know how to make in LaTeX, see How to look up a symbol or identify a math symbol or character?.

  1. Indentations (shown in the MS Word Ribbon)

Indentation of paragraphs is handled automatically. Quotations should be set with either the {quote} or the {quotation} environment (there is a difference between the two; see What's the difference between the environments quote and quotation?). For other indentation needs, see How can I change the margins for only part of the text?.

  1. Fonts (font names/types displayed in the Font dropdown in MS Word, and the Font sizes)

If you would like to stick with pdfLaTeX, see the font catalog. However, if you would like to use all of the fonts available to your system, just use XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX. (XeLaTeX is simplest, in my opinion.) This will allow you to use the fontspec package and say things like

\setmainfont{Comic Sans MS}
\setmonofont{Wingdings}
% etc.

To change font sizes, use:

This text is normal size, but
\large
all of this text is pretty big!
Except for a couple
{\Large really} big
{\LARGE obnoxiously} large
{\Huge words}.
You can get back down to size with some
{\normalsize normal text}.
If you're feeling
{\small small}, you can get really
{\tiny tiny}, but you can also imitate other sizes like
{\footnotesize footnotes} and
{\scriptsize subscripts and superscripts}.
  • I think Sean Allred and other users have provided me sufficient information to work on LaTeX layout similar to the MS Word. Let me work on it first. If I don't get exactly what I am expecting, I may post another question. – nam Feb 14 '15 at 2:49
  • @nam By all means, post another question if you need to, but be more specific next time :) And keep in mind that the principles inspiring LaTeX far pre-date computers themselves; you must be prepared to empty your cup if you wish to use LaTeX well. – Sean Allred Feb 14 '15 at 2:52

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