1

I have an equation:

\begin{equation}
MMAV1 = \frac{1}{N} \sum_{n=1}^N \omega_n|x_n|, \\
\omega_n =
\begin{cases}
1 & if 0.25N \leq n \leq 0.75N \\
0.5 & otherwise \\
\end{cases}
\label{equ:MMAV1}
\end{equation}

and I want the cases to be displayed on the next line. I have tried using \begin{align} but that splits it into two equations with two reference numbers.

Does somebody know how to do this?

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  • 1
    Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format.
    – Pier Paolo
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:13

1 Answer 1

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You can use aligned instead of align environment

\begin{equation}
\begin{aligned}
\text{MMAV1} &= \frac{1}{N} \sum_{n=1}^N \omega_n|x_n|\,, \\
\omega_n &=
\begin{cases}
1 & \text{if $0.25N \leq n \leq 0.75N$} \\
0.5 & \text{otherwise}
\end{cases}\,.
\end{aligned}
\label{equ:MMAV1}
\end{equation}

Of course, you can ommit the \\ after \omega_n, if you do not want only the cases to be in a different line.

Also the split environment can do the trick (same use).

Both of the above need the amsmath package.

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  • Ah yes. It is as simple as that. I wonder why it did not auto complete to "aligned" for me when I started typing "\begin{align...". Also, what does the & do in front of the equal sign that you added?
    – Sigmundur
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:26
  • @Sigmundur the & sign in the first equation set a "column" where every other & will be placed. In the above example, the two equal signs will be the one under the other. Try to move the first & before \sum to see the difference, or the second one before \begin.
    – Theo
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:50
  • i don't think you want the \\ after the \omega_n on the second line. and there also needs to be an \end{equation] since that environment has been begun. Feb 19, 2015 at 14:50
  • Ah yes. I see now. It aligns the two equal signs just like in the cases to keep them aligned. @barbara beeton correct. I don't want it and thus have removed it. Ending the equation was a given :) Thanks for the help. Now I have everything I need for my equations to be properly formatted. :)
    – Sigmundur
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:55
  • @barbara beeton you are right for the \end{equation}. However, I tried to change the examlpe that Sigmundur asked and to do exactly what he asked for (I want the cases to be displayed on the next line). I commented the other issues right after my example.
    – Theo
    Feb 19, 2015 at 14:57

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