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I am using the marginal note inside the multicol environment. \reversemarginpar command is used to trigger the marginalnote left and right margin placement. But \reversemarginpar command does not work the multicol environment.

My requirement is marginal note trigger left right placement inside the multicol package. How to achieve the requirement

MWE

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}

\usepackage{authblk}
\usepackage{endnotes}
\usepackage{graphics}
\usepackage{multicol}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{etoolbox}
\usepackage{marginnote}


% ------------- comment this at the first run -------------
\AtBeginDocument{\theendnotes\clearpage%
}
%----------------------------------------------------------




\begin{document}

\title{Sample document for endnotes}
\author[1,]{Junli Liu}
\author[2]{James Rowe}
\author[2]{Keith Lindsey}
\affil[1]{Integrative Cell Biology Laboratory, School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, The Bio physical Sciences Institute, Durham University, Durham, UK}
\maketitle

\noindent Patterning\reversemarginpar\endnote{Sample Query Endnote One} in Arabidopsis root development
is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the
root tip (Sabatini et al., 1999), requiring the regulated expression
of speciÞc genes. This auxin gradient has been hypothesized to be sink-driven (Friml et al., 2002) and com- putational modeling suggests that auxin efßux carrier activity may be sufÞcient to generate the gradient in the absence of auxin biosynthesis\endnote{Sample Query Endnote Two} in the root (Grieneisen et al., 2007; Wabnik et al., 2010). However, other experimental studies show that local auxin biosynthesis modulates gradient- directed planar polarity in Arabidopsis, and a local source of auxin biosynthesis contributes to auxin gradient homeostasis (Ikeda et al., 2009). Thus genetic studies show that auxin biosynthesis (Ikeda et al., 2009; Normanly, 2010; Zhao, 2010), the AUX1/LAX inßux carriers (Swarup et al., 2005, 2008; Jones et al., 2008; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010), and the PIN auxin efux carri- ers (Petr‡sek et al., 2006; Grieneisen et al., 2007; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010; Mironova et al., 2010) all play important roles in the formation of auxin gradients. In addition, experimental evidence shows that, in root devel- opment, hormones and the associated regulatory and target genes form a network, in which relevant genes regulate hormone activ- ities and hormones regulate gene expression. For example, ethy- lene promotes auxin ßux in the root, in a process dependent on the POLARIS (PLS) peptide (Ruzicka et al., 2007; Swarup et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2010a). Furthermore, PIN levels are positively reg- ulated by ethylene and auxin in Arabidopsis roots (Ruzicka et al., 2007). Interestingly, cytokinin can negatively regulate PIN lev- els (Ruzicka et al., 2009), while repressing auxin biosynthesis and promoting ethylene responses (Nordstrom et al., 2004; Chandler, 2009; Liu et al., 2010a). Cytokinin also has the capacity to mod- ulate auxin transport, by transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes (Ruzicka et al., 2009).



\begin{figure}[!t]
\caption{The sample caption\label{fig:1}}\endnote{Sample Query Endnote Three}
\end{figure}


\noindent Patterning in Arabidopsis root development
is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the
root tip (Sabatini et al., 1999), requiring the regulated expression
of speciÞc genes. This\endnote{Sample Query Endnote One} auxin gradient has been hypothesized to be
sink-driven (Friml et al., 2002) and com- putational modeling
suggests that auxin efßux carrier activity may be sufÞcient to generate the gradient in the absence of auxin biosynthesis\endnote{Sample Query Endnote Two} in the root (Grieneisen et al., 2007; Wabnik et al., 2010). However, other experimental studies show that local auxin biosynthesis modulates gradient- directed planar polarity in Arabidopsis, and a local source of auxin biosynthesis contributes to auxin gradient homeostasis (Ikeda et al., 2009). Thus genetic studies show that auxin biosynthesis (Ikeda et al., 2009; Normanly, 2010; Zhao, 2010), the AUX1/LAX inßux carriers (Swarup et al., 2005, 2008; Jones et al., 2008; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010), and the PIN auxin efux carri- ers (Petr‡sek et al., 2006; Grieneisen et al., 2007; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010; Mironova et al., 2010) all play important roles in the formation of auxin gradients. In addition, experimental evidence shows that, in root devel- opment, hormones and the associated regulatory and target genes form a network, in which relevant genes regulate hormone activ- ities and hormones regulate gene expression. For example, ethy- lene promotes auxin ßux in the root, in a process dependent on the POLARIS (PLS) peptide (Ruzicka et al., 2007; Swarup et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2010a). Furthermore, PIN levels are positively reg- ulated by ethylene and auxin in Arabidopsis roots (Ruzicka et al., 2007). Interestingly, cytokinin can negatively regulate PIN lev- els (Ruzicka et al., 2009), while repressing auxin biosynthesis and promoting ethylene responses (Nordstrom et al., 2004; Chandler, 2009; Liu et al., 2010a). Cytokinin also has the capacity to mod- ulate auxin transport, by transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes (Ruzicka et al., 2009).  

\onecolumn

\begin{multicols}{3}
\noindent Patterning in Arabidopsis root development
is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the
root tip (Sabatini et al., 1999), requiring the regulated expression
of speciÞc genes. This\endnote{Multi One} auxin gradient has been hypothesized to be
sink-driven (Friml et al., 2002) and com- putational modeling
suggests that auxin efßux carrier activity may be sufÞcient to generate the gradient in the absence of auxin biosynthesis\endnote{Multi Two} in the root (Grieneisen et al., 2007; Wabnik et al., 2010). However, other experimental studies show that local auxin biosynthesis modulates gradient- directed planar polarity in Arabidopsis, and a local source of auxin biosynthesis contributes to auxin gradient homeostasis (Ikeda et al., 2009). Thus genetic studies show that auxin biosynthesis (Ikeda et al., 2009; Normanly, 2010; Zhao, 2010), the AUX1/LAX inßux carriers (Swarup et al., 2005, 2008; Jones et al., 2008; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010), and the PIN auxin efux carri- ers (Petr‡sek et al., 2006; Grieneisen et al., 2007; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010; Mironova et al., 2010) all play important roles in the formation of auxin gradients. In addition, experimental evidence shows that, in root devel- opment, hormones and the associated regulatory and target genes form a network, in which relevant genes regulate hormone activ- ities and hormones regulate gene expression. For example, ethy- lene promotes auxin ßux in the root, in a process dependent on the POLARIS (PLS) peptide (Ruzicka et al., 2007; Swarup et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2010a). Furthermore, PIN levels are positively reg- ulated by ethylene and auxin in Arabidopsis roots (Ruzicka et al., 2007). Interestingly, cytokinin can negatively regulate PIN lev- els (Ruzicka et al., 2009), while repressing auxin biosynthesis and promoting ethylene responses (Nordstrom et al., 2004; Chandler, 2009; Liu et al., 2010a). Cytokinin also has the capacity to mod- ulate auxin transport, by transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes (Ruzicka et al., 2009).  

\reversemarginpar

\noindent Patterning in Arabidopsis root development
is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the
root tip (Sabatini et al., 1999), requiring the regulated expression
of speciÞc genes. This\endnote{Multi Three} auxin gradient has been hypothesized to be
sink-driven (Friml et al., 2002) and com- putational modeling
suggests that auxin efßux carrier activity may be sufÞcient to generate the gradient in the absence of auxin biosynthesis\endnote{Multi Four} in the root (Grieneisen et al., 2007; Wabnik et al., 2010). However, other experimental studies show that local auxin biosynthesis modulates gradient- directed planar polarity in Arabidopsis, and a local source of auxin biosynthesis contributes to auxin gradient homeostasis (Ikeda et al., 2009). Thus genetic studies show that auxin biosynthesis (Ikeda et al., 2009; Normanly, 2010; Zhao, 2010), the AUX1/LAX inßux carriers (Swarup et al., 2005, 2008; Jones et al., 2008; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010), and the PIN auxin efux carri- ers (Petr‡sek et al., 2006; Grieneisen et al., 2007; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010; Mironova et al., 2010) all play important roles in the formation of auxin gradients. In addition, experimental evidence shows that, in root devel- opment, hormones and the associated regulatory and target genes form a network, in which relevant genes regulate hormone activ- ities and hormones regulate gene expression. For example, ethy- lene promotes auxin ßux in the root, in a process dependent on the POLARIS (PLS) peptide (Ruzicka et al., 2007; Swarup et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2010a). Furthermore, PIN levels are positively reg- ulated by ethylene and auxin in Arabidopsis roots (Ruzicka et al., 2007). Interestingly, cytokinin can negatively regulate PIN lev- els (Ruzicka et al., 2009), while repressing auxin biosynthesis and promoting ethylene responses (Nordstrom et al., 2004; Chandler, 2009; Liu et al., 2010a). Cytokinin also has the capacity to mod- ulate auxin transport, by transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes (Ruzicka et al., 2009).  

\noindent Patterning in Arabidopsis root development
is coordinated via a localized auxin concentration maximum in the
root tip (Sabatini et al., 1999), requiring the regulated expression
of speciÞc genes. This\endnote{Sample Query Endnote One} auxin gradient has been hypothesized to be
sink-driven (Friml et al., 2002) and com- putational modeling
suggests that auxin efßux carrier activity may be sufÞcient to generate the gradient in the absence of auxin biosynthesis\endnote{Sample Query Endnote Two} in the root (Grieneisen et al., 2007; Wabnik et al., 2010). However, other experimental studies show that local auxin biosynthesis modulates gradient- directed planar polarity in Arabidopsis, and a local source of auxin biosynthesis contributes to auxin gradient homeostasis (Ikeda et al., 2009). Thus genetic studies show that auxin biosynthesis (Ikeda et al., 2009; Normanly, 2010; Zhao, 2010), the AUX1/LAX inßux carriers (Swarup et al., 2005, 2008; Jones et al., 2008; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010), and the PIN auxin efux carri- ers (Petr‡sek et al., 2006; Grieneisen et al., 2007; Krupinski and Jonsson, 2010; Mironova et al., 2010) all play important roles in the formation of auxin gradients. In addition, experimental evidence shows that, in root devel- opment, hormones and the associated regulatory and target genes form a network, in which relevant genes regulate hormone activ- ities and hormones regulate gene expression. For example, ethy- lene promotes auxin ßux in the root, in a process dependent on the POLARIS (PLS) peptide (Ruzicka et al., 2007; Swarup et al., 2007; Liu et al., 2010a). Furthermore, PIN levels are positively reg- ulated by ethylene and auxin in Arabidopsis roots (Ruzicka et al., 2007). Interestingly, cytokinin can negatively regulate PIN lev- els (Ruzicka et al., 2009), while repressing auxin biosynthesis and promoting ethylene responses (Nordstrom et al., 2004; Chandler, 2009; Liu et al., 2010a). Cytokinin also has the capacity to mod- ulate auxin transport, by transcriptional regulation of the PIN genes (Ruzicka et al., 2009).  

\end{multicols}


\end{document}

I will mentioned below mentioned changes doing the default endnotes.sty

\def\makeenmark{\fbox{\@makeenmark}}

\def\endnote{\@ifnextchar[\@xendnote{\stepcounter{endnote}%
     \protected@xdef\@theenmark{\theendnote}%
     \marginnote{\@endnotemark}\@endnotetext}}

My output and requirement below mentioned here: enter image description here

enter image description here

  • 1
    May we see some code? – daleif Feb 24 '15 at 13:00
  • Do you have even margins? Have you tried the marginnote package? – John Kormylo Feb 24 '15 at 15:08
  • I edit and save my question and provide the MWE and required output. Kindly advice. – Vetri Feb 24 '15 at 16:01
  • @kormylo auto trigger marginal notes left and right side two column environment and also the multicol environment. if you know the concepts kindly share with me – Vetri Feb 25 '15 at 5:11

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