5

I have the OTF files for Garamond #3 LT Pro, supplied by my publisher. I need to use italic small caps. The following MWE:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{Garamond3LTPro}[
  Extension = .otf ,
  BoldFont = *-Bold ,
  ItalicFont = *-Italic ,
  BoldItalicFont = *-BoldItalic ]

\fontspec{Garamond3LTPro-Italic.otf}[Letters=SmallCaps]

\begin{document}
\end{document}

produces the following output:

*************************************************
* fontspec warning: "icu-feature-not-exist-in-font"
* 
* OpenType feature 'Letters=SmallCaps' (+smcp) not available for font
* 'Garamond3LTPro-Italic.otf' with script 'Latin' and language 'Default'.
*************************************************

The publisher insists that Garamond #3 LT Pro Italic has a small caps. Is he wrong, and if so how can I prove it?

What makes me suspicious is that this page:

http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/garamond-3/pro-roman/specs.html

lists smcp among the tags, but this page:

http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/garamond-3/pro-italic/specs.html

does not.

The need for italic small caps is the following. French typography is fond of small caps, in particular for centuries for which roman numerals are used: {\scshape xviii}e siècle (not 18e siècle). In a bibliography, book titles are in italics, and, as we say in English, voilà. (Author names in bibliographies are also in sc, but upright, which Garamond 3 has).

Since my need is limited to a few century numbers in the bibliography (set in 9pt), I suppose that a fake it-sc would be good enough.

  • By the way, welcome to TeX.SE! Incidentally, the Roman (i.e., upright) font face of Garamond #3 does feature small-caps glyphs. It's just italic font face that's missing them. – Mico Mar 7 '15 at 6:11
  • 2
    Or (ideally) convince your publisher not to use italic small caps. To what nefarious purpose will they be put? – jon Mar 7 '15 at 6:42
  • It looks like you've got two separate accounts, which means you cannot edit your original post or leave comments. The StackExchange staff can merge them together for you. – Werner Mar 7 '15 at 19:46
  • I guess you just have created a second account by accident. The StackExchange staff can merge them together for you. – Johannes_B Mar 7 '15 at 19:54
6

As you already know from myfonts.com, Garamond 3 has no small caps italics. I guess that your editor has been using «fake» small caps, which InDesign, LibreOffice or Word can produce. I strongly advise not to use them. Instead, you should try some «real» small caps from other Garamond versions. There are quite a few.

For instance, EB Garamond:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{ebgaramond}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
\emph{\textsc{\lipsum[1]}}
\end{document}

enter image description here

Update

Italic small caps in roman numerals for centuries in French. NB. I added some space between the small caps and the superscript e, because it would look otherwise somewhat cramped.

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{ebgaramond}
\newcommand{\siecle}[1]{\emph{
    \textsc{#1}\kern.1em\textsuperscript{e}
    {siècle}}}
\begin{document}
    \siecle{xv}
    \siecle{xvi}
    \siecle{xvii}
    \siecle{xviii}
    \siecle{xix}
    \siecle{xx}
    \siecle{xxi}
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • 1
    +1 for a good answer. As an aside, this doesn't look like a very good font, in my opinion. Look at the kerning between I and N in INTEGER or between R and A… – it just looks a little half-finished. I wouldn't use it in a production document. – Sean Allred Mar 7 '15 at 17:00
  • @SeanAllred -- Good eye. It looks like the kerning between many capital letters and a following 'small' letter is too big ('Na'; 'Mo'; 'Ma'; etc.). Actually, I wonder if the small 'o' is just plain bad. However, given the (now) stated need for italic, small caps for roman numerals, it may be a decent (enough) solution. Ludenticus, given the OP's addendum, your answer may be improved if you add roman numerals from 1-21 to the provided image. – jon Mar 7 '15 at 18:10
  • 2
    @SeanAllred EB Garamond is indeed a work in progress, and judgments about its quality should be provisional. But the poor kerning seen in the image seems to have more to do with the package ebgaramond than with the font, because when I use fontspec and \setmainfont{EB Garamond} and compile with luatex or xetex, the kerning is fine. – Thérèse Mar 7 '15 at 21:31
3

Three high-quality commercial garaldes that feature small-cap italics are Sabon Next (by Tschichold and Porchez), Palatino nova (by Zapf and Kobayashi), and Garamond Premier Pro (by Slimbach (?)). Among these three fonts, GPP clearly is the most condensed, while Palatino is the least condensed. The Palatino italic shape is also the least slanted of the three.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\begin{document}

\setmainfont{Sabon Next LT Pro}
\subsubsection*{Sabon Next LT Pro}
Le \textsc{xviii}\textsuperscript{e} siècle, 
\textit{le \textsc{xviii}\kern0.5pt\textsuperscript{e} siècle}


\setmainfont{Palatino nova}
\subsubsection*{Palatino nova}
Le \textsc{xviii}\textsuperscript{e} siècle, 
\textit{le \textsc{xviii}\kern0.5pt\textsuperscript{e} siècle}

\setmainfont[ItalicFont = Garamond Premier Pro Italic]{Garamond Premier Pro}
\subsubsection*{Garamond Premier Pro}
Le \textsc{xviii}\textsuperscript{e} siècle, 
\textit{le \textsc{xviii}\kern0.75pt\textsuperscript{e} siècle}

\end{document}
  • I think that they would benefit from some kerning between the roman numerals and the superscript e (just as EB Garamond). Sabon Next is a redesign of Jean François Porchez from the monotype of Tschichold. – Ludenticus Mar 7 '15 at 20:51
  • @Ludenticus - Many thanks for these comments and suggestions. I've added a 0.5pt kern in the italic versions of Sabon and Palatino, and 0.75pt kern in the italic version of GPP. – Mico Mar 7 '15 at 21:08

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