2

How can I make the third matrix beginning from the second line? And how to adjust the spacing of the second matrix since there are some items overlap together?

Thank you very much! enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\[
F=
    \begin{bmatrix} 
      F_ {11} & F_ {12} & 0\\
      F_ {21} & F_ {22} &0 \\
      0 & 0 & F_{33} 
   \end{bmatrix}
   =
    \begin{bmatrix} 
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r} & \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial z}& 0\\
       \dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial r} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial z}  &0 \\
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r} 
   \end{bmatrix}
    =
    \begin{bmatrix} 
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1} & \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 2}& 0\\
       \dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 1} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 2}  &0 \\
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1} 
   \end{bmatrix}
\]

\end{document}
1

1 Answer 1

7

With an align* environment instead of \[...\].

The spacing can be increased substituting \\ with \\[<space>] as in the following MWE.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}

\begin{align*}
F&=
    \begin{bmatrix}
      F_ {11} & F_ {12} & 0\\[1ex]
      F_ {21} & F_ {22} &0 \\[1ex]
      0 & 0 & F_{33}
   \end{bmatrix}
   =
    \begin{bmatrix}
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r} & \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial z}& 0\\[2ex]
       \dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial r} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial z}  &0 \\[2ex]
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r}
   \end{bmatrix}\\[2ex]
    & =
    \begin{bmatrix}
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1} & \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 2}& 0\\[2ex]
       \dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 1} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 2}  &0 \\[2ex]
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1}
   \end{bmatrix}
\end{align*}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

If you need a numbered equation, it is better to use a split inside an equation environment.

MWE

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}

\begin{equation}
\begin{split}
F&=
    \begin{bmatrix}
      F_ {11} & F_ {12} & 0\\[1ex]
      F_ {21} & F_ {22} &0 \\[1ex]
      0 & 0 & F_{33}
   \end{bmatrix}
   =
    \begin{bmatrix}
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r} & \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial z}& 0\\[2ex]
       \dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial r} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_z}{\partial z}  &0 \\[2ex]
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_r}{\partial r}
   \end{bmatrix}\\[2ex]
    & =
    \begin{bmatrix}
     1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1} & \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 2}& 0\\[2ex]
       \dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 1} & 1+\dfrac{\partial u_2}{\partial 2}  &0 \\[2ex]
      0 & 0 & 1+ \dfrac{\partial u_1}{\partial 1}
   \end{bmatrix}
\end{split}
\end{equation}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

3
  • @Windy You're welcome. Remember that you can accept the answer to mark the question as solved. See How do you accept an answer? Mar 13, 2015 at 16:43
  • 1
    I'd prefer split in this particular case, so passing to a numbered equation is easier.
    – egreg
    Mar 13, 2015 at 17:32
  • @egreg You're right, of course. Mar 13, 2015 at 18:32

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .