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For my Ph. D. thesis I want to create a bibliography according to the suggestions given in the german standard DIN 1505.

There exists a quite old style dinat.bst (see TeXFAQ) which I had used in a slightly modified version for my diploma thesis many years ago.

I read a lot of positive things about biblatex and I'm currently planning to switch from my old bibtex to biblatex to hopefully better configure the bibliography.

However it would be very helpful (and I'm quite sure somebody must have done this before me) to have a readily configured citation style which corresponds (or comes close to) to the DIN 1505 and which works with biblatex (even if it is not perfect). I did not find anything about that in the biblatex manual, but maybe I've overlooked it...


I found 2 documents defining the requirements: (I'm sorry: they're both in German which makes sense, as it is a german standard.)

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    I remember seeing a similar question somewhere before. At the time, it did not seem entirely clear that there was a definite style required. Could you either post or link to a detailed list of requirements?
    – Joseph Wright
    Jul 17, 2011 at 20:58
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    I don’t think that there exists a ready-to-use solution, but you could take biblatex’s authoryear style as a starting point, if you really have to use the DIN 1505 style. This discussion on mrunix.de might help you with the label.
    – domwass
    Jul 18, 2011 at 12:31
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    @Martin, as you referred to dinat (which should not be used any more, since natdin is more up to date), I thought you wanted to have Author-Year citations. You can of course build a DIN style based upon biblatex’s numeric style. Which of biblatex‘s features do you need to use? If none, I would stick with natdin.
    – domwass
    Jul 18, 2011 at 14:35
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    I'd also appreciate a ready-made biblatex style compatible with DIN 1505 - unfortunately, I couldn't find one one the Internet, so you'll have to create your own. Dominik Waßenhoven's articles (in German), especially part 2, explain how to do this.
    – diabonas
    Jul 18, 2011 at 16:50
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    @Martin, true, biblatex is “the future”, but if you have to invest a lot of time to get a DIN 1505 style and if you don’t need any of the other functionalities offered by biblatex (and biber) – like true utf8 support, for instance –, then it might be worth to stick with a functioning bst and traditional BibTeX for the moment. If you do need (one of) the functionalities, you have to build your own style, as @diabonas said.
    – domwass
    Jul 19, 2011 at 9:16

1 Answer 1

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I don’t think that there is a ready-to-use solution, but you could take biblatex’s authoryear style as a starting point, if you really have to use the DIN 1505 style. This discussion on mrunix.de might help you with the label. Be aware, though, that you have to invest a lot of time to get a DIN 1505 style and if you don’t need any of the other functionalities offered by biblatex (and biber) – like true utf8 support, for instance – then it might be worth to stick with a functioning bst and traditional BibTeX for the moment. If you do need (one of) the functionalities, you have to build your own style, as @diabonas said.

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  • Hi Dominik, are you aware that anyone in the last three or four years has invested in creating a conforming biblatex style? The question comes up every once in a while and nobody seems to have done it. As you said, quite a lot of work. We could start a github rep and invite people to contribute. Maybe Frank (texwelt.de/blog/modifizieren-eines-biblatex-stils), Ulrike, Clemens, and other guys from the german community. i think all of us are somehow floating around TeXwelt or here.
    – Johannes_B
    Mar 30, 2015 at 12:43
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    Looking at 1505 and the successor ISO 690 leads to a new google search and to github.com/michal-h21/biblatex-iso690
    – Johannes_B
    Mar 30, 2015 at 13:39

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