8

I want to find the french guillemets in latex. To be honest I found them by many ways:

\og text \fg{}

with or without OT1 and french babel, but they do not produce the same result as those which can be seen here: www.phys.ens.fr/~dalibard/Notes_de_cours/X_MQ_2003.pdf on page 7

What do I have to typeset to get these ones?

2
  • 1
    Hum, the guillemets shown in this article are not the standard ones at all. Look at Pluton's answer for the correct version. Mar 17, 2015 at 8:37
  • Yes, please refer to the answer provided by Pluton. I had the same questions as you a few weeks ago when I began to write my internship report. Only csquotes package does provide the right characters for French, and is way easier when you need to write multiple language documents (typically a report for your programming courses, like I had to).
    – wget
    Mar 18, 2015 at 10:22

4 Answers 4

8

The characters you're mentioning show that the document is using the obsolete package aeguill. If you really want to get that shape, you can load the necessary fonts and change the definition of \guillemotleft and \guillemotright to use wncyr; but be aware of the fact that you're using guillemets in Cyrillic style.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[french]{babel}

\frenchbsetup{og = «, fg = »}

\DeclareFontFamily{U}{wncyr}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{wncyr}{m}{n}{<->wncyr10}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{wncyr}{m}{it}{<->wncyi10}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{wncyr}{m}{sc}{<->wncysc10}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{wncyr}{b}{n}{<->wncyb10}{}

\DeclareTextCommand{\guillemotleft}{T1}{%
  {\fontencoding{U}\fontfamily{wncyr}\selectfont\symbol{"3C}}%
}
\DeclareTextCommand{\guillemotright}{T1}{%
  {\fontencoding{U}\fontfamily{wncyr}\selectfont\symbol{"3E}}%
}

\begin{document}

pourrait \og exister \fg{} se trouve

pourrait « exister » se trouve

\end{document}

enter image description here

Compare the output when the “normal” guillemets are used.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[french]{babel}

\frenchbsetup{og = «, fg = »}

\begin{document}

pourrait \og exister \fg{} se trouve

pourrait « exister » se trouve

\end{document}

enter image description here

4
  • Note that you do not even need to load the aeguill package to get that sort of cyrillic guillemets. It is enough to load thebabel package with option french while keeping the OT1 encoding. Cf. my answer below. Mar 17, 2015 at 11:35
  • 1
    And with Frenchb (the french option of babel), you can also insert typographical guillemets in your PDF by using the guillemets characters of the keyboard: you only need to insert the following command in the preamble: \frenchbsetup{og = «, fg = »}. Then they will behave as the \og and \fg commands, i.e inserting the typographical guillemets and the adequate hard spaces (smaller than ~, bigger than \,). Mar 17, 2015 at 12:27
  • @fpast Thanks for the reminder about \frenchbsetup. However, if I leave OT1 as default encoding, I get guillemets emulated with < signs.
    – egreg
    Mar 17, 2015 at 12:49
  • Indeed, but it works as expected. My bad, I should have wrote: ‘‘Then they will behave as the \og and \fg commands, i.e inserting the guillemets (french or cyrillic, following the context) and the adequate hard spaces (smaller than ~, bigger than \,).’’ Mar 17, 2015 at 13:32
3

This is (alas) the kind of guillemets you obtain with the french option of babel, when you forget/neglect to use the T1 font encoding.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[french]{babel}
\begin{document}
\og essai \fg.
\end{document}

enter image description here

They are the same as in the article, but they are not the standard ones. One should also insert \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} in the preamble to obtain the correct french guillemets.

2

These can be obtained with theaeguill package and option [cyr], which uses the french quotes from wncyr. The problem is aeguill supposes you load the obsolete ae package, but maybe it is possible to adapt part of the code so as to use these quotes with, say, Latin Modern.

2

One possible solution below. Note that the package csquotes is used to create a new command \emphg (emphasize with guillemets). Some people here will say that this is not appropriate since csquotes was created to handle quotings but it does a nice work.

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} 
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}    
\usepackage[frenchb]{babel}
\usepackage{csquotes}
\newcommand\emphg[1]{\enquote{#1}}
\begin{document}
La mécanique quantique a d'inattendu que l'on n'arrive pas jusqu'à présent à la mettre en défaut. La seule indication qu'une \emphg{nouvelle} forme de physique pourrait \og exister \fg{} se trouve dans la cosmologie, et concerne les $10^{-43}$ premières secondes de \emphg{l'univers}.
\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • Just realized that I am most probably not answering the question.
    – pluton
    Mar 17, 2015 at 8:17

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