2

I'd like to use the Greek letter qoppa in a formula in an otherwise non-Greek document. I tried using the greekoption for babelbut that turned my document into Greek letters. By default, \qoppadoesn't seem to be defined.

4

Since the qoppa is a stylized symbol, there's probably no need to try and find a version suitable for any font.

Since you want it in math, the simplest thing is to define a stripped down version of the LGR encoding.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,pdftexcmds}

\DeclareFontFamily{U}{cbgreek}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{cbgreek}{m}{n}{
        <-6>    grmn0500
        <6-7>   grmn0600
        <7-8>   grmn0700
        <8-9>   grmn0800
        <9-10>  grmn0900
        <10-12> grmn1000
        <12-17> grmn1200
        <17->   grmn1728
      }{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{cbgreek}{bx}{n}{
        <-6>    grxn0500
        <6-7>   grxn0600
        <7-8>   grxn0700
        <8-9>   grxn0800
        <9-10>  grxn0900
        <10-12> grxn1000
        <12-17> grxn1200
        <17->   grxn1728
      }{}

\DeclareRobustCommand{\qoppa}{%
  \text{\usefont{U}{cbgreek}{\normalorbold}{n}\symbol{19}}%
}
\DeclareRobustCommand{\Qoppa}{%
  \text{\usefont{U}{cbgreek}{\normalorbold}{n}\symbol{21}}%
}
\makeatletter
\newcommand{\normalorbold}{%
  \ifnum\pdf@strcmp{\math@version}{bold}=\z@ bx\else m\fi
}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

$\qoppa+\xi=\alpha-\Qoppa$

\boldmath

$\qoppa+\xi=\alpha-\Qoppa$

\end{document}

enter image description here

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