1

Apparently beamerposter doesn't generate a title automatically, so one has to do it manually. However, the MWE below doesn't work! What is wrong? How can I make this poster design less painful? I just want a big centered title at the top!

\documentclass{beamer}

\usepackage[size=custom,height=105,width=80,scale=1]{beamerposter}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}{}
  \begin{block}
    \VERYHuge A Novel Algorithm for #SAT
  \end{block}
  \begin{columns}[t]

    \begin{column}{.45\linewidth}
      \begin{block}{FOOBAR}
        \VERYHuge foobar
      \end{block}
    \end{column}

    \begin{column}{.45\linewidth}
      \begin{block}{FOOBAR}
       \VERYHuge foobar
      \end{block}
    \end{column}

  \end{columns}

\end{frame}

\end{document}
0

Change # to --> \#. The hashtag character, # has a special function in LaTeX with a special character code. The control sequence (or call it a macro, if you wish) \# is instead assigned to "typeset" the character (since the lone # is interpreted differently.

The lone # is used inside macro definitions (mainly). This is best illustrated with an example.

Say we have \newcommand\mymacro[2]{Typeset the first argument first, #1\par and then the second argument: #2}. The meaning of this is that when you invoke the macro \mymacro as such: \mymacro{foo}{bar}, then foo inside the first set of braces replaces anything in your macro definition where you put #1. Similarly, #2 is replaced with bar. The output is then Typeset the first argument first, foo\par and then the second argument: bar. The number next to the square braces \mymacro[2] (the number 2) is a number that tells LaTeX how many parameters are in your macro, since LaTeX cannot know beforehand how many parameters to expect.

To make the font size bigger, you can control the font size manually with the \fontsize command which takes two arguments. The first argument relates to the point size of the text, while the second argument relates to the interline spacing.

To center the title, I've just use the center environment. I don't think block really serves you well...

To put the title at the top of the poster, I've used the \vfill command, which balances the current page elements in the following way:

If you have two page elements which are seperated by a \vfill, it will separate the two elements to the maximum extent possible (it will "vertically fill" the page at the point where \vfill is specified). If you use multiple commands, you will put an equal amount of filling on both sides, possibly centering a particular element which has \vfill before and after it.

\documentclass{beamer}

\usepackage[size=custom,height=105,width=80,scale=1]{beamerposter}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}{}
  \begin{center}
    \protect\fontsize{100pt}{100pt}\protect\selectfont A Novel Algorithm for \#SAT
  \end{center}

  \vfill
  \begin{columns}[t]
    \begin{column}{.45\linewidth}
      \begin{block}{FOOBAR}
        \VERYHuge foobar
      \end{block}
    \end{column}

    \begin{column}{.45\linewidth}
      \begin{block}{FOOBAR}
       \VERYHuge foobar
      \end{block}
    \end{column}

  \end{columns}
  \vfill

\end{frame}

\end{document}
  • That doesn't make a title centered at the top of the document – Elliot Gorokhovsky May 2 '15 at 18:34
  • @RenéG I read past that. There's a really obvious solution for it: set the fontsize manually. I don't think there's any command past \VERYHuge. See updated answer. – 1010011010 May 2 '15 at 18:40

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