2

This question already has an answer here:

Let's consider the following sentence:

\documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article}
\begin{document}
We often call these players \emph{spoiler} and \emph{duplicator}, \emph{\'Elo\"ise} and \emph{Ab\'elard} or $\exists$ and $\forall$.
\end{document}

What I'd want now is a slanted version of the \forall and the \exists symbols, is there a way to do this (some sort of \mathsl or something like that)?

Or would you say that this really is too ugly?

marked as duplicate by Mico, Svend Tveskæg, Malipivo, user13907, Werner May 6 '15 at 17:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    I'd say that this should be prohibited! – Sigur May 6 '15 at 16:07
  • That's what I thought as well, though I was curious on how it would look. – konewka May 6 '15 at 16:08
  • In case you want to see some related: tex.stackexchange.com/q/220434/14757 – Sigur May 6 '15 at 16:13
2

The following example uses slanting via TikZ:

\tikz[
  baseline=(X.base),
  inner sep=0pt,
  transform canvas={xslant=cos(#1)},
] \node (X) {#2};%

The slant angle is #1 and the slanted material is in #2. For some unknown reason, the bounding box is pretty wrong, the box is horizontally centered at the baseline with much shorter height. Therefore the definition \xslant sets the bounding box manually.

The slant angle can be given by the optional argument. The default is 76 (measured from the slanted upper case I of Computer Modern fonts).

The macro \xslantmath is an extended version, which puts the argument in math and respects the current math style.

\documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article}
\usepackage{tikz}

\newcommand*{\xslant}[2][76]{%
  \begingroup
    \sbox0{#2}%
    \pgfmathsetlengthmacro\wdslant{\the\wd0 + cos(#1)*\the\wd0}%
    \leavevmode
    \hbox to \wdslant{\hss
      \tikz[
        baseline=(X.base),
        inner sep=0pt,
        transform canvas={xslant=cos(#1)},
      ] \node (X) {\usebox0};%
      \hss
      \vrule width 0pt height\ht0 depth\dp0 %
    }%
  \endgroup
}

\makeatletter
\newcommand*{\xslantmath}{}
\def\xslantmath#1#{%
  \@xslantmath{#1}%
}
\newcommand*{\@xslantmath}[2]{%
  % #1: optional argument for \xslant including brackets
  % #2: math symbol
  \ensuremath{%
    \mathpalette{\@@xslantmath{#1}}{#2}%
  }%
}
\newcommand*{\@@xslantmath}[3]{%
  % #1: optional argument for \xslant including brackets
  % #2: math style
  % #3: math symbol
  \xslant#1{$#2#3\m@th$}%
}
\makeatother

\begin{document}
\noindent
We often call these players \emph{spoiler} and \emph{duplicator} or
\xslantmath{\exists} and \xslantmath{\forall}$\!$.
\end{document}

Result

2

Ugly as hell. ;-)

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{graphicx}

\DeclareRobustCommand{\slantflip}[1]{%
  \raisebox{\depth}{%
    \scalebox{1}[-1]{%
      \scalebox{-1}[1]{\slshape\sffamily#1}%
    }%
  }\negthinspace
}

\newcommand{\allsl}{\slantflip{A}}
\newcommand{\allex}{\slantflip{E}}

\begin{document}

\allsl{} and \allex{}

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • Wow, ugly solutions for ugly problems, those are the best – konewka May 6 '15 at 16:23

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