1

How do you represent a text that contains printers' pie: specifically letters the are upside down? I am using ExLaTex and attempting to reproduce 19th century newspaper articles faithfully: including type-setting errors such as inverted 'g' and inverted 'e'.

4

If you absolutely need to do it by rotating characters to get that old-timey feel, the easiest way is probably to use the graphicx package's convenient commands, \rotatebox and \reflectbox. Because it's not clear to me whether you want rotated, reflected, or both, I do all three below.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\def\rotatee{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{e}}
\def\rotateg{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{g}}
\def\inverte{\reflectbox{e}}
\def\invertg{\reflectbox{g}}
\def\rotinve{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{\reflectbox{e}}}
\def\rotinvg{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{\reflectbox{g}}}
\begin{document}
\thispagestyle{empty}
This is sp\rotatee{}ll\rotatee{}d wron\rotateg.

This is sp\inverte{}ll\inverte{}d wron\invertg.

This is sp\rotinve{}ll\rotinve{}d wron\rotinvg.
\end{document}

That gives you this:

Rotated, inverted, and both.

Some of these already exist, however; for example, schwa is a common character, which is a rotated "e". You'd almost certainly be better off using those where they exist.

  • dgoodmaniii, The code worked just as I needed it to. Many thanks. Marz – Marz Jun 15 '15 at 15:05

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