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I'm using linguex glossed examples with subexamples (a), (b), (c), etc. using \ag. \bg. \cg. This works fine until I need more than 6 subexamples: as soon as I try \gg. or \hg. it fails to compile. Is there a way to change this or is there really no way of doing this with Linguex glossed examples?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{gb4e} 
\usepackage{linguex}

\begin{document}

\ex.
\ag. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\cg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\dg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\eg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\fg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\gg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\

\end{document}
5
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Please help us help you and add a minimal working example (MWE) that illustrates your problem. Reproducing the problem and finding out what the issue is will be much easier when we see compilable code, starting with \documentclass{...} and ending with \end{document}.
    – user31729
    Jun 23 '15 at 10:09
  • Sorry, it's such a simple question, I didn't think an MWE was necessary! Added one toy sample now.
    – Marieke
    Jun 23 '15 at 12:19
  • 1
    No there is no direct way to do this. You could hack it with unnumbered examples perhaps. If you need this kind of glossing I would recommend the ExPex package.
    – Alan Munn
    Jun 23 '15 at 12:23
  • Thanks, @AlanMunn that's good to know! Unfortunately I wrote most of my dissertation using Linguex examples, so it would be a bit tedious to change to ExPex at this stage: too bad I hadn't heard of that before! For now I'll just try to split the examples I need or find an unnumbered hack as you suggested.
    – Marieke
    Jun 23 '15 at 12:34
  • Actually maybe I've misunderstood you. Do you need more lines of glossing or just more subexamples? If the latter you can reuse \gla etc. to get more letters.
    – Alan Munn
    Jun 23 '15 at 12:36
1

The linguex markup isn't terribly semantic (which is why I prefer gb4e) but in fact you can get up to 26 lettered subexamples just by repeating the \bg. command as many times as you like:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{linguex}

\begin{document}

\ex.
\ag. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\
\bg. Hallo daar.\\
hello there\\

\end{document}

output of code

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  • Oh thanks, that's perfect - be it a bit counterintuitive. I didn't actually realise the first letter had no meaning at all there (all samples I saw were \ag, \bg, \cg, so I just assumed that's what you had to do. I switched to Linguex early on because it seemed to handle my examples with glosses better than gb4e (I work on historical syntax, so many lengthy examples).
    – Marieke
    Jun 23 '15 at 13:50
  • Since linguex uses the same glossing code as gb4e it's unlikely they differ in their glossing capabilities.
    – Alan Munn
    Jun 23 '15 at 13:53
  • Yes, you're right, I just noticed that myself. Must've been another reason why I switched then; probably because I found its syntax a bit simpler when I just started using LateX...
    – Marieke
    Jun 23 '15 at 14:02
  • @Marieke: \fg is simply defined as \def\fg.{\bg.}. So you can add in similar ways \gg: \def\gg.{\bg.} etc. Jun 24 '15 at 12:20

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