4

I imagined that a scalable font could be scaled to any number. Apparently not? MWE:

% !TEX TS-program = pdflatex
% !TEX encoding = UTF-8 Unicode
\documentclass[12pt,USenglish,letterpaper,final]{memoir}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\checkandfixthelayout
\makeatletter\newlength\stdFontsize\setlength\stdFontsize{\f@size pt}\makeatother
\newcommand\slightlyLarger[1]{{\fontsize{1.08\stdFontsize}{1.25\baselineskip}\selectfont#1}}
\newcommand\yetLarger[1]{{\fontsize{1.1\stdFontsize}{1.25\baselineskip}\selectfont#1}}
\begin{document}
1. Normal text.\par
\slightlyLarger{2. Should be slightly larger, but is not.\par}
\yetLarger{3. Should be yet larger, and is.\par}
4. The log file shows sfrm1200.pfb in use.
\end{document}

Line 2 prints at the same size as line 1, instead of slightly larger. Line 3, with only a tiny increase in requested size, jumps up in size. It seems that the font size is quantified, rather than infinitely scalable.

What am I missing?

2
  • Latex can control the scaling steps. Add \RequirePackage{fix-cm} before \documentclass if you want smooth scaling with the cm-fonts. Commented Jun 24, 2015 at 21:16
  • @Ulrike Fischer: Works! Please re-post your comment as an answer, so I can vote it up.
    – RobtA
    Commented Jun 24, 2015 at 21:18

1 Answer 1

6

Latex can control the scaling steps. Add \RequirePackage{fix-cm} before \documentclass if you want smooth scaling with the cm-fonts.

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