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Im trying to reproduce this molecule using chemfig,

The molecule I want to reproduce.

I have the basic structure with this code:

\begin{figure}
\centering
\schemestart
\chemfig{*6((-F)=-*6(-(-*6(=-=-=-))=*6(-=(-F)-(=O)-=-)--O--)=-=(-^{-}O)-)}
\schemestop
\end{figure}

Yielding this

This is the main structure of the molecule that I've generated. It is still uncomplete.

But cannot generate the ({-}^OCCH)_2 N part and the OCH_2C=OO^{-}. The closest I can get is

\begin{figure}
\centering
\schemestart
\chemfig{O=[:-90]{(^{-}OCCH_2)_2}|N}
\schemestop
\end{figure}

Generated chemical compound. I want the O= bond to the first C on the left.

But the bond does not arrive at the leftside C. Is it there a way to achieve this?

Thank you for your help!

4
  • 1
    \chemfig{{(}^{-}OCCH_2{)}_2N(=[2,,3]O)}
    – cgnieder
    Jul 9, 2015 at 18:09
  • 2
    I have more or less answered this already here: tex.stackexchange.com/a/252176/5049
    – cgnieder
    Jul 9, 2015 at 18:27
  • @clemens Would you like to turn your comment into an answer? Jul 10, 2015 at 1:58
  • @clemens Your cited answer is not "more or less", it is actually the answer I was looking for. I haven't found that information on the chemfig manual until I saw the keyword departure of a bond in your cited answer. Many thanks :D
    – Daniel-M
    Jul 10, 2015 at 3:16

1 Answer 1

3

The answer is the same as in Drawing chemical reactions:

Then CH3CHCH3 must be considered as one group of 6 atoms (C, H, C, H, C and H) where the bond is leaving from the third atom. You need to tell this to chemfig using the bond's optional argument <departure>:

<bond>[<angle>,<length factor>,<departure>,<arrival>,<tikz>]

The code then is \chemfig{CH_3CHCH_3-[2,,3]OH}

In your case:

\chemfig{{(}^{-}OCCH_2{)}_2N(=[2,,3]O)}

enter image description here

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  • Many thanks!, your answer is what I was looking for, it works like charm, and even applied this to other compounds in other related molecules.
    – Daniel-M
    Jul 12, 2015 at 4:21

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