20

The left © is nicely centered within its circle, while the right one is slightly shifted to the top. Why is that?

Edit: highly related question: how to get good looking copyright and registered symbols?

copyright and helvet copyright

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{helvet}
\begin{document}
\copyright~\textsf{\copyright}
\end{document}
3
  • 4
    Because it's constructed and the parameters are tailored on Computer Modern fonts.
    – egreg
    Jul 13, 2015 at 11:37
  • 4
    Add \usepackage{textcomp}. Jul 13, 2015 at 11:46
  • I asked a similar question about the Registered symbol in a comment to another question, and got nothing but useless remarks. This was very helpful, thanks @ojdo. Mar 30, 2017 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

19

Load the textcomp package to get the "real" copyright symbol (also for the cm-fonts):

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{helvet}
\usepackage{textcomp}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\begin{document}
\textcircled{c}~\textcopyright~\textsf{\textcircled{c}~\textcopyright}
\end{document}

enter image description here

4
  • Is there an advantage to use \textcopyright over \copyright? I did not notice a difference.
    – ojdo
    Jul 13, 2015 at 12:48
  • 2
    @ojdo \copyright also works in math mode, whereas \textcopyright doesn't. Actually \copyright is defined to do \textcopyright, with proper protection if found in math mode.
    – egreg
    Jul 13, 2015 at 12:54
  • This is helpful, but you haven't actually answered the main question! Jul 14, 2015 at 4:08
  • @curiousdannii: Well my answer was accepted so I seem to have answered the main question bothering the OP ;-). Many people ask "why does it happen" but actually want to know "what can I do instead". Jul 14, 2015 at 7:10
12

The \copyright symbol, in the default OT1 encoding, is constructed (and actually uses the OMS encoding).

The ‘c’ is shifted by a length tailored on the Computer Modern Roman font, but it's easy to fix this so the character is actually placed in a symmetric fashion inside the circle.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[scaled]{helvet}

\makeatletter
\DeclareTextCommand{\textcircled}{OMS}[1]{\hmode@bgroup
   \ooalign{%
      \hfil$\m@th\vcenter{\hbox{\upshape#1}}$\hfil\crcr
      \char 13 % "0D
   }%
   \vphantom{\char 13}%
\egroup}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

c\textsf{c} C\textsf{C}

\copyright~\textsf{\copyright}
\end{document}

Note that helvet should be loaded with the scaled option, or the letters will be much higher than those in the Roman font.

From the comparison it's still clear that lowercase letters in Helvetica are still bigger than those in the Roman font, but with \vcenter it's unimportant; of course I exploit the fact that the big circle is centered with respect to the math axis.

enter image description here

If you load the textcomp package, the symbol will not be constructed, but in the Helvetica font it will be smaller and raised above the baseline.

1
  • 3
    Great! But it reminds me this joke: "Circular argument" Tech support: How may I help you? Customer: I'm writing my first e-mail. Tech support: OK, and what seems to be the problem? Customer: Well, I have the letter 'a' in the address, but how do I get the circle around it? guy-sports.com/humor/computers/computer_tech_support_calls.htm
    – Ho1
    Jul 13, 2015 at 12:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.