2

I tried to write Arabic numerals. For individual digits, there is no problem, but the problem starts with two numbers or more like the example below:

1980 should be ١٩٨٠ [correct]. But in my case I got ٠٨٩١ which means 0891 [Reversed, not correct] .

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    Nitpick: Technically they are all arabic numerals, right to left ones are eastern arabic numerals. Can you show us your document that doesn't give the right results? – percusse Jul 16 '15 at 17:10
  • @percusse There is no change in direction for numerals; apart from the shape of digits, numerals written in English and Arabic are exactly the same when looked at. Which is a problem when a number is generated and then printed in reverse form. – egreg Jul 16 '15 at 17:23
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    @egreg Yes. I meant the naming convention. The rest is plain MWE request. – percusse Jul 16 '15 at 17:42
  • may be duplicate, see the answer of this tex.stackexchange.com/questions/252582/… – touhami Jul 17 '15 at 0:04
  • @SoranAlnaqshbandi : Please provide a Minimal Working Example which replicates the problem, help us help you! – AboAmmar Jul 17 '15 at 0:21
3

You can use the same advice given by @touhami in a previous answer to a similar question.

Since you didn't provide a MWE, I assumed you are using the babel package. Here is an example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[english,arabic]{babel}

\begin{document}
\selectlanguage{Arabic}
بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

نحن نستخدم الآن الجمل باللغة العربية : 

١٩٨٠

1980

\I{1980}

\I{١٩٨٠}

\bigskip

{
\selectlanguage{english} 
We are now using the English language sentence ...

1980 \par
\I{1980}
}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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