5
\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec,kantlipsum}

\begin{document}
\fontspec[Scale=0.9]{Trebuchet MS}

\kant[1]
\end{document}

I'm using XeLaTeX but the text is way to black, it's like if I were writing the whole document by using \textbf{}. Is there a way to get a 'softer' font? Not too black I mean.

  • Try adding Color=black!70 (70% black) to your font specification. – Werner Jul 24 '15 at 17:44
  • I've added it but there's no changes. I put 70, 80, 90 but text font remained still. – Alejandro Jul 24 '15 at 17:49
  • 3
    The "weight" or "blackness" of a font is determined by the font designer. If you feel Trebuchet MS is too black for your liking, you must change to a different font. Some fonts offer a "Light" weight in addition to "Bold" and "Regular" (and possibly others), but unfortunately Trebuchet MS is not such a font. – Paul Gessler Jul 24 '15 at 17:54
2

Define your colour shade of black first and then add that to the font specification using the Color (or Colour) key-value:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec,lipsum,xcolor}

\begin{document}

\fontspec[Scale=0.9]{Trebuchet MS}

\lipsum[1]

\definecolor{myblack}{rgb}{.7,.7,.7}% 30% black
\addfontfeature{Color=myblack}%

\lipsum[1]
\end{document}

Combined usage would be

\definecolor{myblack}{rgb}{..,..,..}
\fontspec[Scale=0.9,Color=myblack]{Trebuchet MS}
  • 1
    Based on the mention of \textbf in the question I gathered the OP is asking about the font's weight, or "color" in the typographical sense, not the literal color of the text. – Paul Gessler Jul 24 '15 at 19:18
  • @PaulGessler: True... My approach provides a "poor man's weight" for the font. :-| Not ideal. – Werner Jul 24 '15 at 19:22

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