3

I often write

\begin{enumerate}
\item [\textbf{1}]
\item [\textbf{2}]
.
.
.
\end{enumerate}

but is there a way to get \item [\textbf{1}] automatically by just putting \item? (I don't want to set a \newcommand, I just want that everytime I put \item yield me a new number in the style \textbf{number}.)

  • Look at the 'enumitem' package. – musarithmia Jul 25 '15 at 20:21
5

Add this to your preamble:

\usepackage{enumitem}
\setlist[enumerate,1]{label=\arabic*, font=\bfseries}

or

\setlist[enumerate,1]{label=\bfseries\arabic*, ref=\arabic*}

if you want bold labels at the first level of enumerate for the whole document, or just load enumitem and use this for specific environment:

\begin{enumerate}[label=\arabic*, font=\bfseries]
   % or [label=\bfseries\arabic*, ref=\arabic*]
\item first item
\item second item
………………
\end{enumerate}
  • It's probably better to add ref=\arabic* – egreg Jul 25 '15 at 21:18
  • @egreg: Why that? Isn't it automatic? – Bernard Jul 25 '15 at 21:41
  • No, by default enumitem sets the ref value equal to label – egreg Jul 25 '15 at 21:42
  • @egreg; I see. There's also the solution font= which affects only the label. – Bernard Jul 25 '15 at 21:50
0

Or you can create a new environment to do what you want

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}

\newenvironment{mylist}
{\begin{enumerate}[label=\textbf{\arabic*}]}
{\end{enumerate}}

\begin{document}

\begin{enumerate}[label=\textbf{\arabic*}]
\item First item
\item Second item
\end{enumerate}

\begin{mylist}
\item First item
\item Second item
\end{mylist}

\end{document}
  • 1
    Wouldn't it be better to use \newlist? Also, see the comments on Bernard's answer. – cfr Jul 25 '15 at 22:07
0

Using the enumitem package, \usepackage{enumitem}:

enter image description here

If you need this behavior locally you can directly insert in the options to enumerate the specifications of your labels. If you need it global, then set in the preamble the same as Bernard's answer, \setlist[enumerate,1]{label=\bfseries\arabic*}. You can remove or leave the dot as required or add spaces where needed.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumerate}
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[{\bfseries 1.}]
  \item some item 1
  \item some item 2
  \item some item 3
  \item some item 4
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

This approach is particularly easy if you don't want to remember names, e.g.,

[\bfseries 1.] % for Arabic numbers
[\bfseries I.] % for Capital Roman 
[\bfseries A.] % for Capital alphanumeric, ...etc.
  • Note you can have the same syntax with enumitem, if you load it with the shortlabels option. – Bernard Jul 26 '15 at 0:18

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