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I know you can apply different font sizes in math mode such as \scriptstyle and \scriptscriptstyle. What I am looking for is a way to get that "size" but still have the "style" of \displaystyle.

Specifically I am wanting to put limits in the numerator and denominator of a fraction, and the \displaystyle makes the expressions nearly overrun the fraction bar. Here's the code I am using...

$\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}\left(\frac fg\right)=\frac{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}f}{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g},$ provided $\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g\ne0.$
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    Not quite clear what you want, and it would be easier if the example was a complete document so could test, but probably remove all the \displaystyle and use \lim\limits_{... – David Carlisle Jul 29 '15 at 15:41
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    see also top answer here: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/161073/… – Bort Jul 29 '15 at 15:42
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\documentclass{article}


\begin{document}

You have

$\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}\left(\frac fg\right)=\frac{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}f}{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g},$ provided $\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g\ne0.$

However it should be (compare the final dot):

$\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}\left(\frac fg\right)=\frac{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}f}{\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g},$ provided $\displaystyle\lim_{x\to c}g\ne0$.

You want to either


$\lim_{x\to c}\limits\left(\frac fg\right)=\frac{\textstyle\lim_{x\to c}\limits f}{\strut\textstyle\lim_{x\to c}\limits g},$ provided $\lim_{x\to c}\limits g\ne0$.

or:


$\lim_{x\to c}\limits\left(\frac fg\right)=\frac{\lim_{x\to c}\limits f}{\lim_{x\to c}\limits g},$ provided $\lim_{x\to c}\limits g\ne0$.

\end{document} 

enter image description here

  • \limits was the way to go for me. Regarding your first comment, I see no difference. – John Molokach Jul 29 '15 at 16:13
  • @JohnMolokach If the dot end a sentence it should be after the dollar sign. In this case there are no differences in the result, but $something$. shows the inner logic of a document. – Przemysław Scherwentke Jul 29 '15 at 16:16

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