0

Say I have 8 equations all of different length including equations that are 3 lines long on an A4 paper. When I type them on Latex, I can separate the long sentence by using "$$$$" to break it and it then continues on the line below. What disturbs me though is that the calculations do not look neat. They look like:

(x+y)+(x+z)+(f+p)+e^s+ ....+p^y=0

l+p+i+....-(i+d)^y+(fg+1)^7....+ 

\hspace{2cm}6+0+9-(io+8)^7+(54)^i+xvy+....+p^s+kope^x =0 

where {what I wrote} is any algebraic data you would like to insert and the \hspace is what my latex is giving me without me intending to put that space. How to make those looks neater. To start from the same point and each broken line to start directly under the line before it without me going and studying where to put the "$$$$" and breaking it so as it looks neat and then it turns out that it does not and so on and so forth... Maybe if you have another idea for how to structure those in a nicer way than the one I asked about, I would be thankful.

  • 1
    a group of equations this long is best treated as a multi-line display, with each equation starting on a separate line. the "correct" alignment depends on the structure of the individual equations, and you haven't given enough detail to be able to say what that is. take a look at the document for the amsmath package, in particular the environments align and gather. if you are using one of the usual tex distributions, you should be able to find it with texdoc amsmath. – barbara beeton Aug 9 '15 at 12:30
  • 1
    First you shouldn't use $$$$ as it is plain TeX, and gives bad vertical spacing with LaTeX. It is suppose to be on one single line. For multiline displays, use one of the amsmath environments (such as align*). A minimal working example would be welcome! – Bernard Aug 9 '15 at 12:31
  • It is impossible to see what your input looks like here but certainly this should be a displayed equation environment (so \[ or \begin{aligned} etc so you should have no $ or \hspace in the input. – David Carlisle Aug 9 '15 at 21:13

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.