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I configured Minion Pro to correctly work with LaTeX through FontPro.

I'd like to use it only for bold, bold italic, and section names, while being able to use any other font for text and math.

Is it possible?

Thanks in advance.

  • Sounds like a job for fontspec. Do you have an MWE? (Also, welcome to TeX.SX!) Note that to use fontspec, you must use xetex/luatex which support native use of system fonts (which obviates fontpro). – Sean Allred Aug 29 '15 at 13:22
  • The request is for plain pdftex, not xetex or luatex. I have a MWE and a sort of solution, I'll post it now for you to give me an opinion. – Luca C Aug 30 '15 at 17:38
  • I recognize that, but I still think it's better suited for fontspec (which of course means not using pdftex – that's why I pointed it out). – Sean Allred Aug 30 '15 at 17:41
1

I've found out a solution. Here's a MWE:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{MinionPro} % https://github.com/sebschub/fontpro
\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage{titlesec}

% garamondx emph
% install it with https://www.tug.org/fonts/getnonfreefonts
\let\emph\relax
\DeclareTextFontCommand{\emph}{\fontfamily{zgmx}\selectfont\em}

% minion pro bold
\let\textbf\relax
\DeclareTextFontCommand{\textbf}{\fontfamily{MinionPro-LF}\selectfont\bfseries}

% minion pro bold italic
\newcommand{\bit}[1]{\textbf{\textit{#1}}}

% minion pro bold section
\titleformat{\section}
{\fontfamily{MinionPro-LF}\selectfont\bfseries}{\thesection}{1em}{}

\begin{document}

\section{Test}

normal, \emph{emph}, \textbf{bold} and \bit{bold italic}

\end{document}

The aim was to reproduce this, but in pdfTeX, and with Garamond Expert as \emph.

The result :)

  • 1
    That is fairly grotesque, though, isn't it? especially the mis-matched italics.... – cfr Aug 30 '15 at 19:47
  • I did not ask for an aesthetic opinion, though. – Luca C Aug 31 '15 at 9:46
  • Indeed. In fact, it is an answer and not a question. Moreover both aesthetics and opinions are off-topic. But there is a certain degree of freedom in comments, I think, and TeX users are typically - although not necessarily - using TeX in part for aesthetic reasons. – cfr Aug 31 '15 at 11:26
  • My aim was just TeXnical, that's why I took the same freedom as you to reply. – Luca C Sep 1 '15 at 13:53

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