2

Do you know how is it possible to write this equation in LaTeX? I tried with this type, but it seems that this is not the correct version of writing.

\begin{equation}

$$K_ox=\frac{d^(2/3)_o}{n_x} \frac{1}{[\frac{\partial h_o}{\partial s}]^2}$$

\end{equation}

enter image description here

  • 2
    You don't want to use $$ at all. You probably mean \begin{equation} K_ox .... \end{equation}? – yo' Sep 3 '15 at 13:31
  • 1
    don't use $ inside equation you are already in math mode. – David Carlisle Sep 3 '15 at 13:31
3

Your main error has been addressed in comments. For the rest see my MWE:

% arara: pdflatex

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}
\begin{equation}    
    K_{ox}=\frac{d^{2/3}_o}{n_x} \frac{1}{[\partial h_o/\partial s]^{1/2}}  
\end{equation}
\begin{equation}    
    K_{ox}=\frac{\sqrt[3]{d^2_o}}{n_x} \frac{1}{\sqrt{\partial h_o/\partial s}} 
\end{equation}    
or $\sqrt{\frac{\partial s}{\partial h_0}}$ or $\dfrac{1}{\bigl(\frac{\partial h_o}{\partial s}\bigr)^{0.5}}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

  • And, as you are suggesting at the end, rather not $d_o$ and $h_o$, but $d_0$ and $h_0$. – Przemysław Scherwentke Sep 3 '15 at 13:55
  • @PrzemysławScherwentke Uh, haven't even noticed. Just typed it once (with zero) and the rest was copied). Well, the OPs picture shows some "o"s so I just leave it as it is. – LaRiFaRi Sep 3 '15 at 13:57

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