7
\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{TeX Gyre Termes}

\begin{document}
This is English with some Greek: γέγονεν.
Isn't that quite nice? εὕρηκα!
\end{document}

Output using XeLaTeX:

This is English with some Greek: γέγονεν. Isn’t that quite nice? ε�ρηκα!

Output using LuaLaTeX:

This is English with some Greek: γγονεν. Isn’t that quite nice? ερηκα!


It seems that ὕ is missing in XeLaTeX (presumably because it is not part of the font), but έ is present. Both are missing in LuaLaTeX. Any suggestion about how to get LuaLaTeX to find the έ?

  • The font doesn't have the character έ (U+03AD). XeLaTeX fakes it somehow, but I don't know how. – Sverre Sep 19 '15 at 15:12
  • The faked έ is quite nice looking, it's a pity it can't manage the ὕ in a similar manner! – Joe Corneli Sep 19 '15 at 20:45
5

As Sverre says, the basic problem here is that the font does not support Greek. Moreover, you are not loading any package to actually deal with multilingual typesetting i.e. either Babel or Polyglossia.

For example, the following works for LuaLaTeX:

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setmainlanguage[variant=british]{english}
\setotherlanguage{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{GFS Artemisia}[Ligatures=TeX]
\newfontfamily\greekfont{GFS Artemisia}[Ligatures=TeX,Script=Greek]

\begin{document}
  This is English with some Greek: \textgreek{γέγονεν}.
Isn't that quite nice? εὕρηκα!
\end{document}

GFS Artemisia

The GFS fonts all provide Greek since they are from the Greek Font Society. However, the above example does not work correctly in XeLaTeX.

In contrast, GFS Bodoni works with either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX:

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setmainlanguage[variant=british]{english}
\setotherlanguage{greek}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{GFS Bodoni}[Ligatures=TeX]
\newfontfamily\greekfont{GFS Bodoni}[Ligatures=TeX,Script=Greek]

\begin{document}
  This is English with some Greek: \textgreek{γέγονεν}.
Isn't that quite nice? εὕρηκα!
\end{document}

GFS Bodoni

You could, of course, still use TeX Gyre Termes as the main font for Latin scripts, but then you need to think about selecting a complementary font for Greek. So if you can find a font you like which supports both Latin and Greek scripts, life is probably easier.

I thought that XITS would make a good alternative to Termes since they are both Times clones. Unfortunately, though, XITS does not give the correct output for either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX, so it seems not a good choice, even though it claims to support Greek.

7

TeX Gyre Termes has very limited support for Greek. You can try the Tempora font, just included in TeX Live with today's update.

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Tempora}

\begin{document}

This is English with some Greek: γέγονεν.

Isn't that quite nice? εὕρηκα!

\end{document}

enter image description here

For single words, you can just type them; for more complex phrases or complete sentences, marking up the text with polyglossia commands or environments is highly recommended.

Update

As of today's (2015-10-01) update, Tempora seems to behave also with LuaLaTeX

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{scrartcl}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{polyglossia}

\setmainlanguage{english}
\setotherlanguage[variant=ancient]{greek}

\setmainfont{Tempora}
%\newfontfamily\greekfont[Script=Greek]{Tempora}

\begin{document}
This is English with some Greek: \textgreek{γέγονεν}.

Also without \verb|\textgreek|: γέγονεν

Isn't that quite nice? \textgreek{εὕρηκα}!

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • The example works as desired with XeLaTeX but with LuaLaTeX it produces This is English with some Greek: γγονεν. Isn’t that quite nice? εὕρηκα! – Joe Corneli Sep 19 '15 at 23:28
  • @JoeCorneli I checked and both XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX load the same font file. However, if I look at the font in “Font Book” and there is something quite strange. What seems to happen is that “epsilon with tonos” is rendered with “epsilon with oxia” by XeLaTeX, but not by LuaLaTeX. More strangely, “epsilon with tonos” exists only in Tempora Italic. – egreg Sep 20 '15 at 7:51
  • @JoeCorneli I saw in the TeX Live repository the announcement for a new version of the Tempora fonts: tug.org/svn/texlive/trunk/Master/texmf-dist/doc/fonts/tempora/… It should be available by tomorrow (2015-10-01) on all mirrors. – egreg Sep 30 '15 at 22:00
  • 1
    @JoeCorneli I added the test for LuaLaTeX with the result after updating Tempora. The bug seems to have been fixed. – egreg Oct 1 '15 at 7:36
5

The font TeX Gyre Termes doesn't have the Greek character U+03AD"GREEK SMALL LETTER EPSILON WITH TONOS".

If you want to, you can fake it by adding U+0301 "COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT":

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{TeX Gyre Termes}
\begin{document}
This is English with some Greek: γε\char"0301γονεν.
\end{document}

Produces:

enter image description here

The accent doesn't look quite right, but that's because the font also doesn't have U+0384 "GREEK TONOS" which you would normally use for Greek. As you can understand, you simply shouldn't use TeX Gyre Termes for Greek. You should pick another font.

  • OK. It's a pity, because the the Termes Greek letter forms are really beautiful. Thanks for the info! – Joe Corneli Sep 20 '15 at 13:42

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