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Currently, I have to use the F1 key to get PDF output.

I want to set up Texmaker so that it automatically shows me an in-IDE preview of the PDF file that my .tex file compiles to...as I type. How would I go about doing this?

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    Thats a function that you probably do not want: it needs some time to render an average pdf document, so it makes perfect sense to do this only if the user wants it. Rendering the pdf on every keystroke or every n Seconds would result in quite heavy disk activity and CPU load. The solution is to get used to editing the source code. A good formatting of the .tex file can help (newlines, indentation, comments...). This question has some other suggestions: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/21746/live-tex-compilation
    – 0x6d64
    Aug 30, 2011 at 10:01
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    @0x6d64: Please turn your comment into an answer.
    – lockstep
    Dec 4, 2011 at 14:23
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    To me this is a comment, not an answer. Nov 5, 2013 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

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Try Gummi, the lightweight and very efficient alternative to Texmaker. It can do the automatic compilation as described. If you are on Ubuntu, Gummi is included in the official repository, so just do apt-get install gummi.

Another option is to use the online (and collaborative) editor Overleaf, which can also do auto compilation but it's a bit slower.

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switching a comment to an answer

Thats a function that you probably do not want: it needs some time to render an average pdf document, so it makes perfect sense to do this only if the user wants it. Rendering the pdf on every keystroke or every n Seconds would result in quite heavy disk activity and CPU load. The solution is to get used to editing the source code. A good formatting of the .tex file can help (newlines, indentation, comments...). This question has some other suggestions: Live tex compilation

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    It could be an option. Many Windows users would like to have live preview. TexMaker only takes less than 2 seconds on one core to compile a standard 10-page PDF (put aside the first compilation), it could be done in the background. Latexian on Mac has a live preview feature and it works very well. Nov 5, 2013 at 19:10
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    This is not an answer for the question
    – fishbone
    Feb 28, 2015 at 14:22
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    When I do this, my average CPU usage climbs by 1% to 3% -- I wouldn't call that heavy CPU load.
    – frabjous
    Jan 16, 2019 at 18:11
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My current favourite is VSCode + LaTeX Workshop plugin + a separate PDF viewer.

  1. Write some TeX, save.
  2. By default, the LaTeX Workshop will compile the PDF automatically.
  3. Open the PDF file in a viewer. Make sure your viewer supports automatic refresh.

I am on Ubuntu and I use the default Evince PDF viewer, which works great in the scenario.

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  • Thanks for the great tip! You can do auto-reload of the PDF file within VSCode now as well. Mar 16 at 0:05

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