2

I need to write this reaction scheme:

enter image description here

But I can't figure out how to place the NADH molecule like it is in the figure. Help me please, thanks!


Thanks to Clemens' comment, I've worked out this MWE:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{chemfig}
\begin{document}
\schemestart
    \chemfig{A}
    \arrow(aa--){0}[-70,.5]
    \chemfig{B}
    \arrow(@aa.mid east--.mid west)
    \chemfig{C}
\schemestop
\end{document}

enter image description here

6
  • An example with molecule "A" and "B" would be sufficient! Just to understand the positioning. Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 10:15
  • this site already has quite a few examples of using chemfig's schemes. Have you already checked those?
    – cgnieder
    Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 10:20
  • @clemens Googling this thing mostly returned issues about the anchoring points of schemes, I couldn't find one example of free positioning of a molecule. Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 10:27
  • 1
    There is no free positioning. Either anchors or invisible arrows. I'm sure the site search for chemfig schemes will return some examples
    – cgnieder
    Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 10:35
  • My comment only was a comment, really. If there was a specific question and its answers that helped you, I'd rather we close this question as duplicate
    – cgnieder
    Commented Sep 30, 2015 at 19:36

1 Answer 1

2

There is no free positioning. But with the help of invisible arrows it is not too hard:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{chemfig}
\setatomsep{1.8em}
\begin{document}

\schemestart
  \chemfig{EtO-[:-30](=[6]O)-[:30]-[:-30](=[6]O)-[:30]}
  \arrow{0}[-60,.4]
  \chemname
    {\chemfig{*6(-N(-R)-=(-(=[2]O)-[::-60]NH_2)-(<:[:70]H)(<[:120]H)-=)}}
    {NADH}
  \arrow(@c1--)
  \chemfig{EtO-[:-30](=[6]O)-[:30]-[:-30](<:[6]O|H)-[:30]}
  \+{,,-10pt}
  \arrow(--[yshift=-20pt]){0}[,0]
  \chemname
    {\chemfig{*6(=\chemabove{N}{\scriptstyle+}(-R)-=(-(=[2]O)-[::-60]NH_2)-(-H)=-)}}
    {NAD$^+$}
\schemestop

\end{document}

enter image description here

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