5

Consider the following mwe:

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage[babel,german=guillemets]{csquotes}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}

\begin{document}

    \foreignquote{french}{lipsum}

\end{document}

Result:

enter image description here

Is there an easy way to reduce the spacing between the text and the guillemets?

Note: The idea is to use \foreignquote{french}{...} to typeset UML strereotypes.

update

\enquote{lipsum} looks ok:

enter image description here

BTW: I'm using the guillemets to typeset UML strereotypes, it is not about French typography.

5
  • 2
    @sergej Then don't use csquotes. \newcommand*\stereotype[1]{«#1»}
    – Manuel
    Oct 13, 2015 at 17:39
  • @Manuel Makes sense. However, I'm using \enquote all over the place in my document and it felt obvious to use csquotes for stereotypes as well.
    – sergej
    Oct 13, 2015 at 17:48
  • 2
    The fact that a quote has a syntax similar to your stereotypes has nothing to do with it. csquotes is for quotes; you are not quoting but using a particular syntax: define your own command.
    – Manuel
    Oct 13, 2015 at 17:51
  • I guess you're right, but grrr... ;)
    – sergej
    Oct 13, 2015 at 17:57
  • French typography wants a space after « and one before » and apparently this is what csquotes implements. I endorse Manuel's opinion that csquotes is not the right tool for your application.
    – egreg
    Oct 13, 2015 at 19:19

1 Answer 1

6

Just don't try to use csquotes for something it isn't necessary, nor designed, nor useful. The fact that your syntax has «» doesn't mean it has anything to do with quotes.

\newcommand*\stereotype[1]{«#1»}

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .