2

MWE:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
This is the first quote:
\quote{\lipsum[1]}
This sentence and the following quote should not be inside the first quote:
\quote{\lipsum[2]}
\end{document}

After the first quote, the quote indentation should end and go back to normal, but instead, the following paragraph continues at the same indentation as the first quote. The second quote hence gets double indentation.

Why is this the case, is it regular behaviour and how can I prevent it?

  • 1
    \quote is not a command with argument: correct is \begin{quote}text\end{quote} – egreg Oct 15 '15 at 6:49
  • Isn't quote an environment, i.e. \begin{quote}\lipsum[2]\end{quote} – moewe Oct 15 '15 at 6:49
  • The moderncv class, unfortunately, defines \quote as a command with argument. But it's not so in the standard classes, in Koma classes and memoir. – egreg Oct 15 '15 at 6:54
4

The only class I know that defines \quote as a command with argument is moderncv (see Problem with \quote and \raggedright in ModernCV for an example).

All other classes I know define a quote environment. As a consequence, the command \quote is defined, but it should never be used in a document (unless it's in the moderncv class, of course).

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\begin{document}

This is the first quote:
\begin{quote}
\lipsum[1]
\end{quote}
This sentence and the following quote should not be inside the first quote:
\begin{quote}
\lipsum[2]
\end{quote}

\end{document}

What happens in your example? When TeX sees \begin{quote}, it issues \begingroup that acts as a scope for the following setup declarations, such as wider margins, spacing between paragraphs and so on; after opening the group, the command \quote is issued, which indeed does the setup.

When, later, \end{quote} is found, a command \endgroup is issued, that ends the scope and reverts parameters to their previous values. Since you don't have a scope, such setup continues forever.

  • Thank you for your answer! Sorry if this isn’t the right place, but: For short quotes, should I use \enquote{...} instead of \begin{quote}...\end{quote}? – Philipp Oct 15 '15 at 11:33
  • 1
    @Philipp Usage of \enquote is up to you. This command (with argument) is handy because it can decide about in line or displayed quotes, so it's a bit different from the quote environment. – egreg Oct 15 '15 at 11:35

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