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Assume I write something about LaTeX in email. I use UTF-8 so I can use any UNICODE character I want. Which characters should I technically use for name "LaTeX"? I believe that LaTeX originally did not mean letters L + a + T + e + X (that is, mixture of uppercase and lowercase ASCII characters). I know that usually LaTeX is written in ASCII characters only outside LaTeX source code where one just enters \LaTeX.

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    The name is latex or LaTeX, there is no special unicode involved. \LaTeX is a logo. I normally use latex or pdflatex when I mean the application or when I'm lazy, and LaTeX for the format. Oct 22, 2015 at 11:02
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    I think the question is mainly if the X should be Greek Capital Letter Xi
    – MaxNoe
    Oct 22, 2015 at 11:06
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    U+004c LATIN CAPITAL LETTER L U+0061 LATIN SMALL LETTER A U+0054 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER T U+0065 LATIN SMALL LETTER E U+0058 LATIN CAPITAL LETTER X Oct 22, 2015 at 12:09
  • Why not U+004C LATIN CAPITAL LETTER L U+0061 LATIN SMALL LETTER A U+03A4 GREEK CAPITAL LETTER TAU U+0395 GREEK CAPITAL LETTER EPSILON U+03A7 GREEK CAPITAL LETTER CHI as in LAΤΕΧ? Oct 23, 2015 at 7:22
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    As far as I know, the defintion of the command \TeX which typesets the TeX logo (as part of the LaTeX logo) is just {T\kern-.1667em\lower.5ex\hbox{E}\kern-.125emX} and thus does not use Greek characters. Therefore, I see no point in using Greek characters for writing an Unicode version of the logo either. May 5, 2023 at 12:04

2 Answers 2

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The latex logo does not contain any special characters. It has only normal uppercase roman letters. It is traditionally typed in latex itself with said logo with the command \LaTeX. Outside of latex, people usually write "LaTeX" or "latex". Also see Wikipedia on this.

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  • The Wikipedia article could use some editing, but any time I've tried to correct anything in Wikipedia regarding TeX, It's been rejected. Too bad. I was there. Regarding the logo, it is best rendered as "LaTeX", no fancy coding unless you know exactly what you're doing. Even publishers of LaTeX-related books have been known to get it wrong on book covers. May 4, 2023 at 21:22
  • @barbarabeeton Did you add links to references for your changes that got reverted? Wikipedia seems to be really strict about rule "No original research" nowadays. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:No_original_research for more details. May 5, 2023 at 8:45
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    @MikkoRantalainen -- No, I almost certainly didn't add links, because what I was trying to correct was code and reasoning for the change to conform to "best practices". Even usually good sources sometimes slip up on such things, by either omission or commission, so finding a suitable link may not be easy, if even possible. I can only go on my own experience which apparently isn't recognized unless it's been published in something I've actually written. Makes no sense, and isn't worth the effort, so I just don't recommend the LaTeX Wikibook. May 5, 2023 at 14:09
  • I agree that it would be much better for Wikipedia to allow original research, too, as long as it's clearly written as such. However, I understand their reasoning if they want to be a pure dictionary replacement only. May 8, 2023 at 9:34
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At least currently, there isn't a way to replicate the appearance of the LaTeX logo in normal text with Unicode. If you're using LaTeX, just use \LaTeX to insert the logo. If you're using some other typesetting program, you may be able to shift the letters around to match the logo. But otherwise, it's probably best just to stick to the standard plaintext "LaTeX". If you try hard enough you can come up with some fancier options, but none of them are particularly attractive (LᴬTᴇX? LᵃTₑX?), and definitely none of them is official.

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