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This question already has an answer here:

I am writing math. questions like these:

  • Complete the missing numbers: 3,4,...,...,7
  • 5+...=7
  • The rectangle contains four ... angles (choices: acute, obtuse or right)

In each case of the mentioned ones, which is the suitable to use? (dots - ldots - cdots - a blank)

marked as duplicate by Werner, user13907, darthbith, Svend Tveskæg, Martin Schröder Oct 22 '15 at 20:34

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    \dots is an amsmath macro that tries to automate the choice between ldots and cdots (by looking at the following symbol mostly) – David Carlisle Oct 22 '15 at 18:23
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    relevant, though not duplicates: \dots versus \ldots - is there a difference? and Difference of the \dots* – barbara beeton Oct 22 '15 at 18:25
  • @barbarabeeton: The first asks "when to use \dots and/or \ldots"... for me a clear duplicate. – Werner Oct 22 '15 at 18:26
  • @werner -- to some extent i agree, but it doesn't cover \cdots, which is why i referred to the second question as well. – barbara beeton Oct 22 '15 at 18:33
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    The referred questions are neglecting the issue of when to use it specifically. So, i need more clarification and i put these examples to get your help. – Ayman Osama Oct 22 '15 at 18:49
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AMS offers several dot (ellipsis) styles, use the one matching your intent:

  • \dotsc: For use between commas, e.g a, b, \dotsc, z
  • \dotsb: To elide binary operators, like a_n z^n + a_{n - 1} z^{n - 1} + \dotsb + a_0
  • \dotsm: Ditto, multiplications, as in n! = n \cdot (n - 1) \dotsm 1

There is also a set for use in arrays (matrices).

In general, I've found that the extra work to select the precise alternative instead of hoping LaTeX will Always Do The Right Thing is minimal, and pays off in better results (as said LaTeX selection is based on very limited information).

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Since what you try to do is like a cloze text, consider using underlines. This is (from what I recall) what a cloze text should have.

You could do it like this

The rectangle contains \underline{\;\phantom{right}\;} angles.

producing

Result of the above command.

This will work in maths environment, as well. I added \; for some extra spacing.

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