3

I'm using the beamer class for a presentation and have a table in which I list several outcomes that are theoretically possible. I then want to fade out those that are not common in real life.

I want to first show all solutions in normal black color, then fade the unrealist ones.

So far I work with the \setbeamercovered{transparent} and then \onslide command. However, this only seems to work in the other direction: It fades the line in the first show of the slide and then shows it in plain black in the 2nd. That's exactly the wrong way around.

I will post my code in three snippets: First the preamble, then two versions of the table.

Here's a preamble:

\documentclass{beamer}

\mode<presentation>
{
\usetheme{Berlin}     
\usecolortheme{default} 
\usefonttheme{default}  
\setbeamertemplate{navigation symbols}{}
\setbeamertemplate{caption}[numbered]
} 

\usepackage[ngerman, english]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{trees,shapes}
\usepackage[normalem]{ulem} 
\begin{document}
\setbeamercovered{transparent}

And here's the code that produces the output in the wrong order

\begin{table}[H]
\caption{Stackexchange is cool because sometimes I can solve my problems while writing the question. Just formulating it helps to get fine ideas.}
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|}\hline
& & Yes& No\\\hline
A & &  1 & 2 \\
B & smile & \onslide<2->$\alpha$\onslide<1->& $\beta$ \\
&& &$\delta$\\
& wuff & $\gamma$ & $\Delta$\\

\end{tabular}
    \end{table}

And here's the code that I thought would solve my problem but just only produced the slide once -- without any kind of fading in/out.

\begin{frame}
\begin{table}[H]
\caption{Stackexchange is cool because sometimes I can solve my problems while writing the question. Just formulating it helps to get fine ideas.}
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|}\hline
& & Yes& No\\\hline
A & &  1 & 2 \\
B & smile & \onslide<1>$\alpha$\onslide<1->& $\beta$ \\
&& &$\delta$\\
& wuff & $\gamma$ & $\Delta$\\\hline

\end{tabular}
    \end{table}
\end{frame}

and well, a fourth code snippet:

\end{document}

Interestingly, it seems to be about the fact that I want the rest of the table to be seen all the time. If I change the \onslide<1-> to \onslide<2->, it does produce output: It shows everything up to the alpha in black; everything after that faded in the first view and then everything in black but the alpha in the second view. So in this case the 2nd output is correct, the first one is not.

2

Are you after this?

\documentclass{beamer}

\mode<presentation>
{
\usetheme{Berlin}
\usecolortheme{default}
\usefonttheme{default}
\setbeamertemplate{navigation symbols}{}
\setbeamertemplate{caption}[numbered]
}

\usepackage[ngerman, english]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{trees,shapes}
\usepackage[normalem]{ulem}
\begin{document}
\setbeamercovered{transparent}
\begin{frame}
  \begin{table}[H]
\caption{Stackexchange is cool because sometimes I can solve my problems while writing the question. Just formulating it helps to get fine ideas.}
\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|}\hline
& & Yes& No\\\hline
A & &  1 & 2 \\
B & smile & \onslide<1>{$\alpha$}& \onslide<1-2>{$\beta$} \\
&& &$\delta$\\
& wuff & $\gamma$ & \onslide<1>{$\Delta$}\\

\end{tabular}
    \end{table}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

  • almost -- the last Delta was supposed to be always there, but I got that by erasing the \onslide<1> and the curly brackets. Thanks so much; I knew it was only a minor change that I could not find... – PikkuKatja Oct 24 '15 at 12:41
  • @PikkuKatja That delta was my folly. I intentionally did it :) – user11232 Oct 24 '15 at 12:41
  • hihi, well, it was a folly obvious enough even for me to find it ;-) the solution works very neatly! Thanks a lot!! – PikkuKatja Oct 24 '15 at 12:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.