3

I am writing an article in mathematics using TeXstudio.

So, I was wondering if there is a standard way to cite a theorem which has a name.

For example,

\begin{thm}[ABC's theorem, Author 1, Author 2 \cite{key}]
     content...
\end{thm}

or

\begin{thm}[ABC's theorem \cite{key}]
     content...
\end{thm}

In my article, I have tried to put the authors' names before the citation number.

For example,

\begin{definition}[author \cite{key}]

So, in order to be consistent, should I use only the citation number or there is a different way of writing name of the theorem, authors, citation number.

Thank you.

6
  • 1
    Welcome to TeX.SE. Citation and cross-referencing conventions are heavily field-dependent. In which field do you work?
    – Mico
    Nov 5, 2015 at 17:13
  • @Mico Sorry, I have updated my question. The field I work is mathematics.
    – johnny09
    Nov 5, 2015 at 17:17
  • Do you use any theorem-related packages, such as amsthm or ntheorem?
    – Mico
    Nov 5, 2015 at 17:18
  • @mico I think so. I am quite new to LaTeX, and I am only using these packages amsmath,amsfonts,amsthm,graphicx,mathtools. I don't know what the ntheorem package does.
    – johnny09
    Nov 5, 2015 at 17:22
  • 2
    You may want to read pages 3 and 4 of the user guide of the amsthm package. For instance, the code snippet \begin{lem}[Alinhac-Lerner \cite{a-l}] produces Lemma x. (Alinhac-Lerner [nn])., where n is the number of the lemma and xx is the citation call-out number.
    – Mico
    Nov 5, 2015 at 17:38

0

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.