1

Consider the following image of a snippet of text. I would like to know how this is reproduced, especially with the diagonal '\cdots' and \dfrac.

Continued Fraction

2

Here's an attempt to reproduce the screenshot you've posted. The code uses a top-aligned array environment. The amsmath package provides the \dfrac macro. Note that I've tried to assure the correct spacing around the + symbols, something that the screenshot does not do.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\[
\setlength\arraycolsep{0pt}
\frac{u_0}{u_1}=\xi_0=a_0+
  \begin{array}[t]{ccc}
  \dfrac{1}{a_1+{}}\\
  \ddots\\
  & {}+{} & \dfrac{1}{a_{j-1}+\dfrac{1}{a_j}}.
  \end{array}
\]
\end{document}
1
  • So simple actually and intuitive... ddots! Nov 19 '15 at 17:33
1

Is this what you are looking for?

\documentclass{scrartcl}
\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}

\[
  \frac{u_0}{u_1} = \xi_0 = a_0 + \cfrac{1}{a_1 + \cfrac{1}{\dotsb + \cfrac{1}{a_{j-1} + \cfrac{1}{a_j}}}}
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

Or this (if you use this multiple times, create a command that expands to the whole \vcenter{..} expression)

\[
  \frac{u_0}{u_1} = \xi_0 = a_0 + \cfrac{1}{a_1 + \cfrac{1}{\vcenter{\hbox{$\ddots$}} + \cfrac{1}{a_{j-1} + \cfrac{1}{a_j}}}}
\]

enter image description here

3
  • Almost, note the difference in the dots. Nov 19 '15 at 17:24
  • I am specifically interested in how the 'diagonal dots' are done. Nov 19 '15 at 17:27
  • You have to use \ddots but since the dots sit quite high, it doesn't look good, I used \vcenter{\hbox{$\ddots$}} to lower it down (in fact, centering the symbol around the math axis).
    – Manuel
    Nov 19 '15 at 17:28

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.