1

I wrote a topical reference for my booklet and my cross-reference for items in enumerate does not work. Could you please help to explain why it happened?

\documentclass[twosides,9pt]{report} 
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb,latexsym, amscd, amsthm}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{angles,quotes,calc} 
\usepackage{pgf,tikz}

\usetikzlibrary{patterns,decorations.pathmorphing,decorations.markings}
\usepackage{graphics} 
\usepackage{multicol} 
\usepackage{enumerate}
\usepackage{amsfonts} 
\usepackage{multicol,color}
\usepackage{indentfirst}

\usepackage{fancybox} 
\begin{document}
\chapter{Maths Meet }

\noindent\shadowbox{\large Maths Meet 1501}
\begin{enumerate}[\scalebox{1.0521}{\bf\arabic{enumi}.}] \item $N$ is
a positive integer that is divisible by 6 but gives a remainder 6 when
divided by 11. Find the least value of $N$. %Dap an 6 \item $N$ is a
positive integer that gives the same remainder when divided by 3, 4
and 7 but gives a remainder 3 when divided by 11. Find the least value
of $N$. %Dap an 168 \item Galiton  chooses a five-digit integer and
then deletes one of its digits to make a four-digit number. The sum of
this four-digit number and the original five-digit number is 42357.
What is the sum of the digits of the original five-digit number? %Dap
so 23.

\item \label{question4} If numbers are arranged in three rows $A, B,
C$ in the following manner, which row will contain the number 1000? 

\begin{tabular}{ccccccccc} $A$&1&6&7&12&13&18&19&$\cdots$\\
$B$&2&5&8&11&14&17&20&$\cdots$\\ $C$&3&4&9&10&15&16&21&$\cdots$
\end{tabular}

%Dap an C  \item $P_n$ is defined as the product of the digits in the
whole number $n$. For examples, $P_{19}=1\times 9=9$, $P_{32}=3\times
2=6$. Find the value of 
\[P_{10}+P_{11}+P_{12}+\cdots+P_{98}+P_{99}.\]%Dap so 2025

\item Give an account of why we have the area formula for triangle.

\item How many five-digit numbers are multiples of 5 and 8? (APMOPS
Year 2001) 
%Dap so 2250 \item \parbox[t]{2.049815in}{How manytriangles are there in the figure?}  
\hspace{1pt}
\raisebox{-25pt}[10pt]{\setlength{\unitlength}{1pt}
\begin{tikzpicture} \tikzset{scale=.5}
\fill[color=black,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1] (4,4) -- (2,1) -- (6,1)
-- cycle; \draw [color=black] (4,4)-- (2,1); \draw [color=black] (2,1)-- (6,1); \draw [color=black] (6,1)-- (4,4); \draw (3.33,2.99)--
(6,1); \draw (6,1)-- (2.65,1.97); \draw (4,4)-- (3.34,1); \draw
(3.34,1)-- (5.27,2.09); \end{tikzpicture}} %Dap so 24 hinh


\item $ABCD$ is a rectangle. Point $E, F$ are on $BC$ and $CD$
respectively such that the areas of triangles $ABE$ and $ADF$ are 4
cm$^2$ and 9 cm$^2$. Given that the area of $ABCD$ is 24 cm$^2$, find
the area of $AEF$. (APMOPS Year 2001) 



\item A string has been cut into 4 pieces, all of different lengths.
The length of each piece is 2 times the length of the next smaller
piece. What fraction of the original string is the longest piece?


\item \parbox[t]{3.09815in}{Toothpicks are used to make a grid that is
60 toothpicks long and 32 toothpicks wide. How many toothpicks are
used altogether?}  \hspace{1pt}
\raisebox{-34pt}[10pt]{\setlength{\unitlength}{1pt}
\begin{tikzpicture} \tikzset{scale=.56} \draw [thick] (3,4)-- (2,4);
\draw [thick] (2,5)-- (2,4); \draw [thick] (2,4)-- (3,4); \draw
[thick] (3,4)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (3,5)-- (2,5); \draw [thick]
(3,5)-- (3,4); \draw [thick] (3,4)-- (4,4); \draw [thick] (4,4)--
(4,5); \draw [thick] (4,5)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (2,3)-- (1,3); \draw
[thick] (1,5)-- (4,5); \draw [thick] (1,3)-- (1,5); \draw [thick]
(3,3)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (1,3)-- (3,3); \draw [thick] (2,3)--
(2,5);

%\draw [thick] (1,3)-- (1,2); %\draw [thick] (1,2)-- (2,2); %\draw
[thick] (2,2)-- (2,3); \draw[thick] (3,4)-- (3,3); %\draw [thick]
(3,3)-- (4,3); %\draw [thick] (4,3)-- (4,4); \draw [thick] (4,4)--
(3,4); \draw[thick] (4,5)-- (4,4); %\draw[thick](4,4)-- (5,4); %\draw
[thick] (5,4)-- (5,5); %\draw [thick] (5,5)-- (4,5); \draw[thick]
(1,5)-- (4,5); \draw[thick] (2,5)-- (2,3); \draw[thick] (1,5)-- (1,3);
\draw[thick] (3,5)-- (3,3); \draw[thick] (4,5)-- (4,4); \draw[thick]
(1,4)-- (4,4); \draw[thick] (2,3)-- (3,3); \draw[dashed] (4,5)--
(5,5); \draw[dashed] (4,4)-- (5,4); \draw[dashed] (4,4)-- (4,3);
\draw[dashed] (3,3)-- (4,3); \draw [dashed](2,3)-- (2,2);
\draw[dashed] (1,3)-- (1,2);

\draw[dashed] (3,3)-- (3,2); \draw[dashed] (4,3)-- (4,2);
\draw[dashed] (4,3)-- (5,3); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](1,5) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](2,2) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](3,2) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](5,3) circle (0.12cm);

\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](5,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](5,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,2) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,2) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,2) circle (.12cm);

\end{tikzpicture}}


\item One of the outer angles of a triangle is 135 degrees. The
difference of two of its inner angles is 29 degrees. What could the
inner angles of this triangle be?

\item An ant is crawling on the edges of a cube, starting from one
vertex. How many edges can it go through the most if it can go on
every edge only once?

\item The sum of ten positive integers, not necessarily distinct, is
1001. If $d$ is the greatest common divisor of the ten numbers, find the maximum possible value of $d$. \item Given four different prime
numbers $a, b,c,d$, if the product  of $a\times b\times c\times d$
\end{enumerate}


\chapter*{Topical Reference}

\section{Number theory}

Question \ref{question4} on page \pageref{question4}
\section{Geometry}

\section{Counting}

\end{document}
4
1

The enumerate package provides a means to format the \item labels in a very specific way. From the documentation:

An occurrence of one of the tokens A a I i or 1 produces the value of the counter printed with (respectively) \Alph \alph \Roman \roman or \arabic.

These letters may be surrounded by any strings involving any other TeX expressions, however the tokens A a I i 1 must be inside a { } group if they are not to be taken as special.

Your use of

\begin{enumerate}[\scalebox{1.0521}{\bfseries \arabic{enumi}}]

never uses any of the suggested tokens outside a group. As such, you receive the following

LaTeX Warning: The counter will not be printed.
             The label is: \scalebox {1.0521}{\bfseries \arabic {enumi}} on input line XX.

in your .log.

It is possible though to use a delimited argument macro to capture-and-format the output under enumerate:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{lipsum}% Just for this example
\usepackage{graphicx,enumerate}

\begin{document}

See Question~\ref{question4}.

\def\enumlabelformat#1\relax{\scalebox{1.0521}{\bfseries #1}}

\begin{enumerate}[\enumlabelformat 1.\relax]
  \item \lipsum[1]
  \item \lipsum[2]
  \item \lipsum[3]
  \item \label{question4}\lipsum[4]
\end{enumerate}

\end{document}

However, enumitem supersedes enumerate and provide a far more elegant way of specifying labels using a key-value approach.

3

The usage of \scalebox etc. in the enumerate environment labelling option screws up the counter (and label system). Better use enumitem and label={\large \bfseries \arabic*.} to change the label.

And don't use \bf!

\documentclass[twosides,9pt]{report} 
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb, latexsym, amscd, amsthm} 
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{angles,quotes,calc} 
\usepackage{pgf,tikz}
 \usetikzlibrary{patterns,decorations.pathmorphing,decorations.markings}
\usepackage{graphicx} 
\usepackage{enumerate}
\usepackage{amsfonts} 
\usepackage{multicol}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\usepackage{enumitem}

\usepackage{indentfirst}

\usepackage{fancybox} 
\begin{document}
\chapter{Maths Meet }

\noindent\shadowbox{\large Maths Meet 1501}
\begin{enumerate}[label={\large \bfseries\arabic*.}]
%\begin{enumerate}%[\scalebox{1.0521}{\bfseries \arabic{enumi}.}] 
\item $N$ is
  a positive integer that is divisible by 6 but gives a remainder 6 when
  divided by 11. Find the least value of $N$. %Dap an 6 \item $N$ is a
  positive integer that gives the same remainder when divided by 3, 4
  and 7 but gives a remainder 3 when divided by 11. Find the least value
of $N$. %Dap an 168 \item Galiton  chooses a five-digit integer and
then deletes one of its digits to make a four-digit number. The sum of
this four-digit number and the original five-digit number is 42357.
What is the sum of the digits of the original five-digit number? %Dap
so 23.

\item \label{question4} If numbers are arranged in three rows $A, B,
C$ in the following manner, which row will contain the number 1000? 

\begin{tabular}{ccccccccc} 
$A$&1&6&7&12&13&18&19&$\cdots$\\
$B$&2&5&8&11&14&17&20&$\cdots$\\ 
$C$&3&4&9&10&15&16&21&$\cdots$
\end{tabular}

%Dap an C  \item $P_n$ is defined as the product of the digits in the
whole number $n$. For examples, $P_{19}=1\times 9=9$, $P_{32}=3\times
2=6$. Find the value of 
\[P_{10}+P_{11}+P_{12}+\cdots+P_{98}+P_{99}.\]%Dap so 2025

\item Give an account of why we have the area formula for triangle.

\item How many five-digit numbers are multiples of 5 and 8? (APMOPS
Year 2001) %Dap so 2250 \item \parbox[t]{2.049815in}{How many triangles are there in the figure?}  \hspace{1pt}
\raisebox{-25pt}[10pt]{\setlength{\unitlength}{1pt}
\begin{tikzpicture} \tikzset{scale=.5}
\fill[color=black,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1] (4,4) -- (2,1) -- (6,1)
-- cycle; \draw [color=black] (4,4)-- (2,1); \draw [color=black] (2,1)-- (6,1); \draw [color=black] (6,1)-- (4,4); \draw (3.33,2.99)--
(6,1); \draw (6,1)-- (2.65,1.97); \draw (4,4)-- (3.34,1); \draw
(3.34,1)-- (5.27,2.09); \end{tikzpicture}} %Dap so 24 hinh


\item $ABCD$ is a rectangle. Point $E, F$ are on $BC$ and $CD$
respectively such that the areas of triangles $ABE$ and $ADF$ are 4
cm$^2$ and 9 cm$^2$. Given that the area of $ABCD$ is 24 cm$^2$, find
the area of $AEF$. (APMOPS Year 2001) 



\item A string has been cut into 4 pieces, all of different lengths.
The length of each piece is 2 times the length of the next smaller
piece. What fraction of the original string is the longest piece?


\item \parbox[t]{3.09815in}{Toothpicks are used to make a grid that is
60 toothpicks long and 32 toothpicks wide. How many toothpicks are
used altogether?}  \hspace{1pt}
\raisebox{-34pt}[10pt]{\setlength{\unitlength}{1pt}
\begin{tikzpicture} \tikzset{scale=.56} \draw [thick] (3,4)-- (2,4);
\draw [thick] (2,5)-- (2,4); \draw [thick] (2,4)-- (3,4); \draw
[thick] (3,4)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (3,5)-- (2,5); \draw [thick]
(3,5)-- (3,4); \draw [thick] (3,4)-- (4,4); \draw [thick] (4,4)--
(4,5); \draw [thick] (4,5)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (2,3)-- (1,3); \draw
[thick] (1,5)-- (4,5); \draw [thick] (1,3)-- (1,5); \draw [thick]
(3,3)-- (3,5); \draw [thick] (1,3)-- (3,3); \draw [thick] (2,3)--
(2,5);

%\draw [thick] (1,3)-- (1,2); %\draw [thick] (1,2)-- (2,2); %\draw
[thick] (2,2)-- (2,3); \draw[thick] (3,4)-- (3,3); %\draw [thick]
(3,3)-- (4,3); %\draw [thick] (4,3)-- (4,4); \draw [thick] (4,4)--
(3,4); \draw[thick] (4,5)-- (4,4); %\draw[thick](4,4)-- (5,4); %\draw
[thick] (5,4)-- (5,5); %\draw [thick] (5,5)-- (4,5); \draw[thick]
(1,5)-- (4,5); \draw[thick] (2,5)-- (2,3); \draw[thick] (1,5)-- (1,3);
\draw[thick] (3,5)-- (3,3); \draw[thick] (4,5)-- (4,4); \draw[thick]
(1,4)-- (4,4); \draw[thick] (2,3)-- (3,3); \draw[dashed] (4,5)--
(5,5); \draw[dashed] (4,4)-- (5,4); \draw[dashed] (4,4)-- (4,3);
\draw[dashed] (3,3)-- (4,3); \draw [dashed](2,3)-- (2,2);
\draw[dashed] (1,3)-- (1,2);

\draw[dashed] (3,3)-- (3,2); \draw[dashed] (4,3)-- (4,2);
\draw[dashed] (4,3)-- (5,3); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](1,5) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](2,2) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](3,2) circle (0.12cm); \draw[color=white,fill=white,fill
opacity=0.1](5,3) circle (0.12cm);

\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](3,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,3) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](5,5) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](5,4) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](2,2) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](1,2) circle (0.12cm);
\draw[color=white,fill=white,fill opacity=0.1](4,2) circle (.12cm);

\end{tikzpicture}}


\item One of the outer angles of a triangle is 135 degrees. The
difference of two of its inner angles is 29 degrees. What could the
inner angles of this triangle be?

\item An ant is crawling on the edges of a cube, starting from one
vertex. How many edges can it go through the most if it can go on
every edge only once?

\item The sum of ten positive integers, not necessarily distinct, is
1001. If $d$ is the greatest common divisor of the ten numbers, find the maximum possible value of $d$. \item Given four different prime
numbers $a, b,c,d$, if the product  of $a\times b\times c\times d$
\end{enumerate}


\chapter*{Topical Reference}

\section{Number theory}

Question \ref{question4} on page \pageref{question4}
\section{Geometry}

\section{Counting}

\end{document}
2
  • +1. I think the code still needs a few line breaks, though, ahead of some of the \item statements, e.g., ahead of \item $P_n$ is defined as the product....
    – Mico
    Dec 7 '15 at 17:47
  • @Mico: The strange spacings etc. is a consequence of the rubbish formatting orginally in the O.P. post. I tried to improve it but I gave up
    – user31729
    Dec 7 '15 at 18:29

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