5

I'm currently writing a text in Spanish that includes limits and I have to use Times New Roman font, so I'm using XeTeX, and thus, Polyglossia.

The problem is: when writing the \lim command, the text displayed is "lim" and not "lím" (with accent mark) as is used in Spanish.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{Times New Roman}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setmainlanguage{spanish}

\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\begin{document}

Éste es el estilo textual: $ \lim_{n \to \infty} \sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k^2} = \frac{\pi^2}{6} $,
y éste el estilo de visualización:
\begin{equation}
\lim_{n \to \infty} \sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k^2} = \frac{\pi^2}{6}
\end{equation}

\end{document}

That gives this result:

Limits does not get accented

Is there something I can do to overcome this issue? Must we consider it a bug?

  • 2
    Welcome to TeX.SE. \lim is, for me, a mathematic notation and so shall not be "tranlated". Have you tried without Times New Roman to see if the result is the same? – Romain Picot Dec 9 '15 at 7:46
  • @RomainPicot Indeed I have tried and the result is the same. Also, I must point out that "lím", in Spanish, stands for "límite", so it must be accented; moreover, while using PDFLaTeX with babel this is not an issue: "lim" gets correctly translated. P.S. Thank you for your welcome! :) – Esteban Mendoza Dec 9 '15 at 7:53
  • Perhaps a deliberate design by polyglossia. Someone with more knowledge about it may confirm (or say how to overcome it) – Romain Picot Dec 9 '15 at 7:57
10

In my opinion, “lim” is a symbolic abbreviation for “limes” (Latin), just like “sin” is for “sinus”.

The fact that the word is translated in various languages doesn't mean the symbol should follow. So, in my opinion, using “lím” is plainly wrong, just like using “sen” as done by almost all Italian school books (later, students learn it's written “sin”).

Of course you're free not to follow this advice or, maybe, some authority (usually the thesis supervisor ;-)) gently asks for the accent. With babel you get it, polyglossia doesn't impose it.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{amssymb}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont{Times New Roman}
\usepackage{polyglossia}
\setmainlanguage{spanish}

\makeatletter
\appto\inlineextras@spanish{\renewcommand\lim{\qopname \relax m{lím}}}
\appto\blockextras@spanish{\renewcommand\lim{\qopname \relax m{lím}}}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

Éste es el estilo textual: $ \lim_{n \to \infty} \sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k^2} = \frac{\pi^2}{6} $, y
éste el estilo de visualización:
\begin{equation}
\lim_{n \to \infty} \sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k^2} = \frac{\pi^2}{6}
\end{equation}

\end{document}

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Although I differ, because I think one must adhere to the rules of style of any language ---as babel does---, I really appreciate your opinion (and be sure I'll be discussing this with my teacher). Thank you very much for your kind answer! – Esteban Mendoza Dec 9 '15 at 8:39
  • 2
    @EstebanMendoza You use Greek letters in math even if they are foreign to Spanish, don't you? – egreg Dec 9 '15 at 8:41
  • 1
    While I think you're right, we then must ask why does babel have used this notation for many years without complaints. – Esteban Mendoza Dec 9 '15 at 9:25
  • @EstebanMendoza The question why does the lime operator have an accent? appears quite often in the support places of this earth. babel also provides an option for that. – Johannes_B Jan 13 '16 at 17:55

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