3

All the questions I've looked at say that curly quotes are the default, but that's not what I'm getting in my PDF.

Is there anything amongst the following that would cause my document to have straight (single) quotes and apostrophes? And what would remedy it? Or is it something to do with other settings?

I'm new to this, so don't know whether it's relevant that I'm using MiKTeX and TeXmaker.)

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
%\usepackage{natbib}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{latexsym}
\usepackage{amsthm}
\usepackage{setspace}
\usepackage[top=1.0in, bottom=1.0in, left=1.6in, right=1.6in]{geometry}
\usepackage{relsize}
\usepackage{mathrsfs}
\usepackage{multirow}
\usepackage{appendix}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
%\usepackage{fontspec}

\usepackage{xcolor}
\hypersetup{
    colorlinks,
    linkcolor={black!50!black},
    citecolor={black!50!black},
    urlcolor={black!50!black}
}

\setcounter{MaxMatrixCols}{10}
  • 1
    What is your input? Curly quotes don't happen by themselves. Use your backticks for open-quotes and apostrophes for close-quotes. – dgoodmaniii Dec 14 '15 at 5:39
  • I posted the question because that's what I'm doing, but the quotes - and apostrophes, as I said - are coming out straight. – David Dec 14 '15 at 6:03
  • 5
    Right, but what's your actual input? Prepare a minimal working example and it'll be a lot easier to help you. – dgoodmaniii Dec 14 '15 at 6:04
7

You do get “curly quotes”! It would be better to speak about “typographic quotes”, which a font designer is free to interpret.

In this case, you're loading pxfonts, so a font package that provides support for Palatino as text font. The font was designed by the great font maker Hermann Zapf, and the shape he chose for the quotes is as seen in the image below, that has been obtained by running LaTeX on your very example.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
%\usepackage{natbib}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{latexsym}
\usepackage{amsthm}
\usepackage{setspace}
\usepackage[top=1.0in, bottom=1.0in, left=1.6in, right=1.6in]{geometry}
\usepackage{relsize}
\usepackage{mathrsfs}
\usepackage{multirow}
\usepackage{appendix}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
%\usepackage{fontspec}

\usepackage{xcolor}
\hypersetup{
    colorlinks,
    linkcolor={black!50!black},
    citecolor={black!50!black},
    urlcolor={black!50!black}
}

\setcounter{MaxMatrixCols}{10}

\begin{document}
``curly quotes''
\end{document}

enter image description here

These are the quotes that come with Palatino; if you don't like them, choose a different text (and math) font.


Unrelated comments to your code.

  1. Don't load latexsym: everything it provides is already available from amssymb.
  2. Do \usepackage{newpxtext,newpxmath} instead of \usepackage{pxfonts}, since the latter package has been unmaintained for several years, whereas NewPX is actively maintained and fixes shortcomings of the older package.
  • Apologies. And thanks. I'm an idiot. Despite the additional information, would it be okay to delete this query? PS I'm not at all sure how to change the output font. How do I go about changing the main text font without altering any of the non-Palatino text, i.e. leaving the maths and logic alone? And would this have any effect on the character produced by, say, $\mathcal{W}$ ? – David Dec 14 '15 at 15:01
  • @David It's an interesting question, in my opinion. I'm not sure what you mean about “non-Palatino” text. – egreg Dec 14 '15 at 15:30
  • I'm not sure what maths and logic font is used, and wondered whether and how these characters would differ. (Creating and editing documents in FrameMaker and InDesign, I've always been particular about maths and logic characters and Greek letters, etc., and used different fonts for different characters to match - aesthetically - the main text.) As I say, I'm not even sure how to dictate the main font being used. I'm used to these things being very evident and explicit on the surface of my editing tool. – David Dec 14 '15 at 15:43

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