3

I'm interested in labelling my latex equation, by giving the physical phenomenon contributing to the term. For instance x = f(y) + g(y). So a horizontal curly bracket to explain that f(y) is derived from some phenomenon, say resistance and g(y) is derived some other phenomenon, say gravity.

How can I give a name to f(y) as resistance and g(y) as gravity in the equation? Hope I'm able to explain my intentions.

Thank you, Aditya

marked as duplicate by Francis, user13907, Jesse, Maarten Dhondt, Svend Tveskæg Dec 22 '15 at 11:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5

You have \underbrace from amsmath and \underbracket from mathtools (which loads amsmath). I added some horizontal adjustment with the \clap command (from mathtools), since the labelled terms are short:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}

    \[ x = \underbracket[0.8pt]{f(y)}_\text{\clap{resistance~}} + \underbracket[0.8pt]{g(y)}_\text{\clap{~gravity}} \]
    \[ x = \underbrace{f(y)}_\text{\clap{resistance~}} + \underbrace{g(y)}_\text{\clap{~gravity}} \]%%

\end{document} 

enter image description here

4

Using the amsmath package, you can do this as follows:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}

\[x = \underbrace{f(y)}_{\text{resistance}} + \underbrace{g(y)}_{\text{gravity}}\]

\end{document}

This yields:

enter image description here

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.