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I'm writing an example where the question says to find what the Legendre symbol of a few numbers are equal to. The theorem style I'm using is 'nonumberbreak' as I like to have my examples start on the following line but as there is a large fraction in the first line of the question, there is some overlap onto the Example header.

Legendre Example overlap

\documentclass{report}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage[amsthm]{ntheorem}
\usepackage{lipsum}

\clubpenalty=10000 \widowpenalty=10000

\newcommand{\qedhere}{\ifmmode\qed\else\hfill\proofSymbol\fi}

\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
\newtheorem{definition}[theorem]{Definition}

\theoremstyle{nonumberbreak}
\theoremseparator{:}
\newtheorem{example}{Example}

\begin{document}

\begin{example}
\normalfont
Find $\left(\dfrac{3}{13}\right)$, $\left(\dfrac{5}{13}\right)$ and  $\left(\dfrac{9}{13}\right)$.
\end{example}

\end{document}

Is there any way to sort this out or make the gap between 'Example' and the next line a bit wider?

Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks.

  • Welcome to TeX.SX! Please provide the code as text and add it to the question above -- a screen shot of the code isn't very useful most times – user31729 Jan 2 '16 at 22:22
  • Sniped of your MWE as figure is not of big help ... please, send code, that it can be copied i (not retyped). – Zarko Jan 2 '16 at 22:22
  • It seems that only will help to insert empty line between theorem body and theorem name. Problem disaper, if you instead \dfrac use standard \frac – Zarko Jan 2 '16 at 22:47
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An rude solution: insert some line beforentheorem body:

\documentclass{report}
    \usepackage{amsmath}
    \usepackage[amsthm]{ntheorem}
    \usepackage{lipsum}
\clubpenalty=10000 \widowpenalty=10000
\newcommand{\qedhere}{\ifmmode\qed\else\hfill\proofSymbol\fi}

\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}[section]
\newtheorem{definition}[theorem]{Definition}
\theoremstyle{nonumberbreak}
\theoremseparator{:\newline}
\newtheorem{example}{Example}

    \begin{document}
\begin{example}
\mbox{}\\[-2ex]% <---- added
Find $\left(\dfrac{3}{13}\right)$, $\left(\dfrac{5}{13}\right)$ and  $\left(\dfrac{9}{13}\right)$.
\end{example}
    \end{document}    

enter image description here

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