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I have been struggling, sincerely, with this citation I got. But, it just won't work. I have identified the citation that creates the error, but I still can't seem to fix it.

@article{sanada2011ndx,
title={NDX-1 protein hydrolyzes 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine-5′-diphosphate to sanitize oxidized nucleotides and prevent oxidative stress in Caenorhabditis elegans},
author={Sanada, U and Yonekura, Shin-Ichiro and Kikuchi, Masahiro and Hashiguchi, Kazunari and Nakamura, Nobuya and Yonei, Shuji and Zhang-Akiyama, Qiu-Mei},
journal={Journal of biochemistry},
volume={150},
number={6},
pages={649--657},
year={2011},
publisher={Jpn Biochemical Soc}
}

I get the error "! Package inputenc Error: Unicode char ′ (U+2032) (inputenc) not set up for use with LaTeX." I of course see the prime at the end of 8-dihydrodeoxyguanosine-5′ (in the title), but I still tried \' \{'} {'}. I also removed the prime completely, with little effect. Which makes me a bit skeptical to whether this is the issue or not. I remade the prime---like 10 times--- trying to copy from the internet, simply making a new prime, and copying; the prime in the PDF viewer, the prime in the error message as well the prime in text editor (which is working outside biblatex). Except for this citation everything is working 'prime', hehe. I have \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}, not sure if the latter matters tho. I'm running windows 10 and TeXstudio. I hope all needed information is provided, else please tell me and I will add the what ever.

Any help is appreciated.

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    The prime triggers the error. You can find out the location of such a problematic char by doing e.g. \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{2032}{XXXXXX} and then looking for the XXXX. I'm not quite sure how a chemist inputs your prime, but \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{2032}{$^\prime$} looks ok to me. – Ulrike Fischer Jan 7 '16 at 17:13
  • It's working like never before! Thanks a lot for the help. Kudos to you. – Baraliuh Jan 7 '16 at 17:27
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From the error message one can guess that your are using \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}.

Then the prime (U+2032) triggers the error. You can find out the location of such a problematic char by doing e.g. \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{2032}{XXXXXX} and then looking for the XXXXXX.

I'm not quite sure how a chemist inputs your prime, but \DeclareUnicodeCharacter{2032}{$^\prime$} looks like a sensible definition to me.

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  • \textprime might also be workable. (not tested, but the same thing happened here at ams today, though in a russian author's name, not a chemical context, and that was the fix used.) – barbara beeton Jan 7 '16 at 19:46

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