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At this moment I am writing my first .tex file using the \input{} command. My 'master' file will look like this.

%preamble

\begin{document}

\input{introduction.tex}

%et cetera

\end{document}

Now, my introduction.tex file looks like this:

\section{Introduction}
This is the first paragraph in the introduction.

This is the second paragraph in the introduction.

Note the blank rule between my first and second paragraph. The output in this case shows:

Introduction
This is the first paragraph in the introduction. This is the second paragraph in the introduction.

When the code from introduction.tex is substituted directly in the master document

%preamble

\begin{document}

\input{introduction.tex}

%et cetera

\end{document}

it shows

Introduction
This is the first paragraph in the introduction. 

This is the second paragraph in the introduction.

This blank rule in the result is what I am looking for, but by using the \input{} method it does not show this. Why is is not showing this blank rule? Is there an easy way to solve this problem without having to use \hfill or something similar every time a paragraph is ended?

  • There must be something in your preamble causing this, because when I compiled your code with only \documentclass{article} in the preamble, it inserted the blank rule correctly. Can you edit in the preamble that you're using? – Arun Debray Jan 7 '16 at 21:18
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    \input will not affect the interpret of a blank line. (I was confused by "rule" as rule in TeX always refers to a solid usually black line (\rule in latex) but I think you are referring to the paragraph break. It is impossible to debug partial fragments, post a complete small document and the complete small file it inputs and describe the output you wish top see – David Carlisle Jan 7 '16 at 21:18
  • Welcome to TeX.SX! You can have a look at our starter guide to familiarize yourself further with our format. – Martin Schröder Jan 7 '16 at 21:32
  • As I said in a comment on your other question, please check that precisely the code you post produces the output you describe. Make a new .tex document, copy the code back there and compile it to see what output you get. If the output gives 2 paragraphs (as it will unless there is something screwed up with your TeX installation), then you know that your minimal example doesn't reflect the problem you want help with and you need to change it accordingly. – cfr Jan 8 '16 at 0:34

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