1

enter image description here

I'd like limits for \oiint shown the same way as for \iint. How can I do?

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage[utopia]{mathdesign}
\begin{document}
$\displaystyle\iint_{M\in\mathcal{S}}   \oiint_{M\in\mathcal{S}}$
\end{document}
3

Like this :-):

enter image description here

\documentclass[border=3mm,preview]{standalone}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage[utopia]{mathdesign}
\begin{document}
\[
\iint_{M\in\mathcal{S}}  \quad   \oiint\nolimits_{M\in\mathcal{S}}
\]
\end{document}
  • Perfect! Thanks. Don't know why it is not the default. – cjorssen Jan 8 '16 at 16:16
  • @cjorssen, me either. Probably the oiint is composed sign and in this is default position below (quit common practice at curve integrals). – Zarko Jan 8 '16 at 16:19
  • 2
    @cjorssen: here's a guess as to why it's default: most of the time in math, if you're integrating from a to b, one uses the \nolimits notation, so \int defaults to \nolimits. However, if you integrate over a set A, it's more common to see \int\limits_A. Since \oiint doesn't really make sense "from a to b," I assume it would default to the more common notation for sets. – Arun Debray Jan 8 '16 at 18:35
  • 1
    @cjorssen I guess that the standard practice for integrals over multidimensional domains is to use \limits; you can get \nolimits by default with \let\oiintop\oiint\renewcommand{\oiint}{\oiintop\nolimits} (in the preamble after having loaded mathdesign). – egreg Jan 8 '16 at 22:43

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