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I'm encountering the same problem as in "roman numbers too wide in table of contents" and in "In table of contents, long page numbers intrude on right margin despite plenty of available space".

I'm not to sure about the solutions presented there. As I use KOMA-Script, I preferred using tocstyle, but the package happily announces:

THIS IS AN ALPHA VERSION! USAGE OF THIS VERSION IS ON YOUR OWN RISK! EVERYTHING MAY HAPPEN! EVERYTHING MAY CHANGE IN THE FUTURE! THERE IS NO SUPPORT, IF YOU USE THIS PACKAGE! Maybe it would be better, not to load this package

Maybe it really would be better not to use tocstyle.

In another answer, I read that tocloft doesn't work well with KOMA-Script. So this is doesn't sound like an alternative either.

The other answer to these questions redefines \@pnumwidth. As I have no knowledge of the LaTeX kernel, I'm not sure whether this changes too many widths.

So my question is, is there a good, stable solution to roman numbers intruding into the margin? Or are any of my concerns with the proposed solutions wrong?

For reference, here's a MWE:

\documentclass{scrreprt}    

\begin{document}

\pagenumbering{Roman}
\tableofcontents

\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage

\chapter{Chapter}
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
Text\clearpage
\section{Section}
Text\clearpage
\section{Section}


\end{document}

And it's result (The margin begins at the last "I" in "XIII"): Table of contents

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  • 1
    Thats alright, the package (tocstyle) is safe to use. Be brave and do it ;-) – Johannes_B Jan 31 '16 at 15:35
  • On a different note: In the past, roman numerals (or a differnent numbering scheme in general) was needed to save time in case of changes. Today, chnging the document and recompiling takes a few minutes maximum thanks to our fast computers. The need for a different numbering scheme really is gone and using arabic numerals all along the document would be the most simple solution. On the other hand, some people stick to old methods like grabbing a tree in a hurricane. – Johannes_B Jan 31 '16 at 15:38
  • @Johannes_B Generally, I agree with your point. In this case, it's a feature of the style guide for my thesis. Actually, it mandates consecutive roman numbering for both front and back matter. So my document currently has pages I-VII,1-32,VIII-XVII. Aside from that, maybe it makes it easier to find out how many pages of "real" text it has. – KarlKlammer Jan 31 '16 at 15:43
  • (see also page VI) ... not only is that quite ugly, but the reader does not know, if page VI is in the front or the backmatter. The guys in the thesis office are thehurricane guys. – Johannes_B Jan 31 '16 at 15:47
  • @pnumwidth is only used for the numbers in tables of contents and similar lists such as list of figures etx – David Carlisle Jan 31 '16 at 16:33