1

I am very new in BibLaTex. I need such a way to cite:

Tropical cyclones (TCs), referring to hurricanes, typhoons, tropical storms, and weaker tropical depressions (Vitart et. al, 1997).

Reference

[1] Vitart, F., J. L. Anderson, and W. F. Stern, 1997: Simulation of inter-annual variability of tropical storm frequency in an ensemble of GCM integrations. J. Climate, 10, 745–760.

What kind of bibstyle should I use? I didn't find anything that meets my requirement.

Thanks a lot!

P.S. In summary, the style that I want to cite should be

Text (author, 2015)

Reference

[#] Author, 2015. Article name. Journal name....

This may be most likely to authoryear in BibLaTex. But I still don't know how to use it. Here is my code.

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article}
\usepackage[bibstyle=authoryear,citestyle=authoryearbrak]{biblatex}
\begin{document}
   Tropical cyclones (TCs), referring to hurricanes, typhoons, tropical storms, and weaker tropical depressions \parencite{Bengtsson-L.:1982aa}. 

\addbibresource{2016MOST_Paper_JRA25TC_20160201.bib} 
\printbibliography
\end{document}

But it's not work. I use BibDesk with my work.

0

Your MWE is of no use since we do not have the contents of your *.bib file. My guess would be that you need to switch your bibliography parser to 'biber'. Does your MWE work with the following adjustments?

\usepackage[bibstyle=authoryear,citestyle=authoryearbrak,backend=bibtex]{biblatex}

If yes, you should change the bibliography tool of your editor to biber and change the

backend=bibtex

to

backend=biber
  • Admitted the example by the O.P. is not really useful, but does this really answer the question? – user31729 Feb 1 '16 at 18:23
  • You are right. It was an uneducated guess from my own experience. – HATEthePLOT Feb 1 '16 at 18:48
  • 1
    Please note that the (cite)style authoryearbrak (i.e. authoryearbrak.cbx) does not exist on CTAN, the only reference to such a file I could find on github: github.com/tehingo/literature-study, but these files haven't been touched in the last two years. – moewe Feb 2 '16 at 17:12

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