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I'm trying to type the conjugate of the fourier transform, so I want a bar over a hat. I only really know one way of doing this but these come out VERY scrambled: $\overline{hat{f}}$ or $\bar{\hat{f}}$.

Help?

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    Precisely for reasons like this, it is much better to use an asterisk for the conjugate. – percusse Feb 12 '16 at 1:43
  • Yes, I agree. Unfortunately, I am pretty stuck with this notation right now. – Ashley Feb 12 '16 at 2:06
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    Which math font do you use? And, are you loading the amsmath package? With this package loaded, $\bar{\hat{f}}$ should mlook alright. – Mico Feb 12 '16 at 3:11
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The accents package was designed for exactly the problem of stacking accents:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{accents}
\begin{document}
$\bar{\hat f}$
\end{document}

It redefines the way that accents are set up in regular LaTeX. This looks about right to me.

If you are using unicode-math, the OpenType maths fonts should be able to stack their accents well by default:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmainfont{xits-math.otf}
\begin{document}
$\bar{\hat f}$
\end{document}

Well, it's not perfect…

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It may work to use something of the following form, which just stacks one symbol on top of another:

\stackrel{upper symbol}{lower symbol}

For the upper symbol, could you just use a rule?

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  • This answer is somewhat incomplete, and would be better suited as a comment. – sodd Feb 13 '16 at 17:13

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