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I am writing my thesis on latex but I do not know how to write Itô's in latex with the symbol on the 'o' . Could someone tell me how can I do it? Do I need a special package?

marked as duplicate by egreg symbols Feb 13 '16 at 17:59

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    ito, what do you mean??? – David Carlisle Feb 13 '16 at 16:04
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    You mean the ô as in Itô? – hooy Feb 13 '16 at 16:04
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    how could anyone guess that's what you meant from the question? there are thousands of uses of ô and Itô (or ito) isn't a word anyone reading in english is likely to recognise!!! you can use \^{o} or simply type ô if you have specified \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} – David Carlisle Feb 13 '16 at 16:09
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    it's completely unclear to me how hooy managed to answer even now. I have no idea what ito or Itô mean so there was no hint in the question that you needed ô it could have been º or ó or anything that you were looking for:-) – David Carlisle Feb 13 '16 at 16:18
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    @NajibIdrissi: Assuming that this is a reference to the late mathematician Kiyosi Itô, it seems he wrote his name in an unusual way. Wikipedia suggests that although standard romanization would call for a macron, the man himself specifically preferred it to be written with a circumflex, in accordance with a different romanization system. – Nate Eldredge Feb 13 '16 at 17:55
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You can make the ô character with \^{o}:

\documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone}
\begin{document}
It\^{o}
\end{document}

Or you can load inputenc package with utf8 option and give the character as a unicode character:

\documentclass[border=10pt]{standalone}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\begin{document}
Itô
\end{document}

Output

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    Isn't it supposed to be written Itō? A macron is not a circumflex... – Najib Idrissi Feb 13 '16 at 17:49
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    @NajibIdrissi It depends who's transliterating. To quote wikipedia "Although the standard Hepburn romanization of his name is Itō, he used the spelling Itô (Kunrei-shiki romanization). The alternative spellings Itoh and Ito are also sometimes seen in the West." Which just about says it all. The spelling is really up to the individual, in the way that some Russians prefer traditional -ff to modern -v, e.g. Poliakoff/Polyakov. But yeah across languages macrons are more common for long vowels now, but the circumflex was often used for long vowels in the past, e.g. Sanskrit Kâlidâsa, now Kālidāsa – Au101 Feb 13 '16 at 17:54
  • @NajibIdrissi I just used the same spelling as Kyoto University's page about Kiyosi Itô. – hooy Feb 13 '16 at 17:57

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