7

We can boldify math equations using \mathbf{} and normal text using \textbf{}.

Suppose I want to boldify a line which contains both normal text and mathematical part simultaneously using a single command. Is it possible?

Let us consider the following example:

                          Since $s=9, s*s$ becomes 81

I have to do as follows

             \textbf{Since} $\mathbf{s=9, s*s}$ \textbf{becomes} 81

Instead of this, is there any newtag, that make whole text bold?

2
  • Do you want letters and symbols to be bold while in math mode, or just the letters? (\mathbf works only on letters.)
    – Mico
    Commented Feb 29, 2016 at 7:37
  • The input is incorrect: Since $s=9$, $s*s$ becomes 81. You need two formulas, not one.
    – egreg
    Commented Feb 29, 2016 at 9:28

2 Answers 2

8

Yo can apply \boldmath:

enter image description here

Surrounding it with {...} limits the scope to be just within the curly braces so subsequent text is not effected.

Notes:

  • As per egreg's suggestion I have replaced $s=9, s*s$ with $s=9$, $s*s$. The , is not really part of the math, thus, it should be outside. This yields better spacing.

Code:

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
Since $s=9$, $s*s$ becomes 81

{\bfseries\boldmath Since $s=9$, $s*s$ becomes 81}

Since $s=9$, $s*s$ becomes 81

\end{document}
2
  • 1
    Could you please change the code $s=9, s*s$ into $s=9$, $s*s$?
    – egreg
    Commented Feb 29, 2016 at 9:29
  • @egreg: Good point. Have corrected. Commented Feb 29, 2016 at 9:51
3

Run with lualatex or `xelatex

\documentclass{article} 
\usepackage{unicode-math}
\setmathfont{xits-math.otf}
\setmathfont[version=bold]{xits-mathbold.otf}
\newcommand\allBold[1]{{\bfseries\mathversion{bold}#1}}
\newcommand\allbold[1]{{\bfseries\boldmath#1}}
\begin{document}

Since $s=9, s*s$ becomes 81 $\displaystyle\int_a^b f(x)\mathrm{d}x$

\allbold{Since $s=9, s*s$ becomes 81 $\displaystyle\int_a^b f(x)\mathrm{d}x$}

\allBold{Since $s=9, s*s$ becomes 81 $\displaystyle\int_a^b f(x)\mathrm{d}x$}

Since $s=9, s*s$ becomes 81 $\displaystyle\int_a^b f(x)\mathrm{d}x$
\end{document}

enter image description here

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