1

Sometimes I am using names of standards, such as "DIN 103". Typing the name in plain text can make it look ugly. Do you have any advice or experience? Can you recommend a generic way that makes it look good? Can you recommend a particular LaTeX standard font?

So far, I have been only adjusting spaces: DIN\,EN\,13001-3 However, sometimes the numbers are smaller than the capital letters.

Related question: Do you have recommendations for setting names of standard components, e.g. "Tr110x12"? So far, I am using Tr\,110x12 but it sometimes looks cramped.


Edit: For now, I have decided to use

\newcommand{\std}[1]{{\fontfamily{pag}\selectfont\footnotesize\textbf{#1}}}%
...
\std{DIN\,103}

I have compiled this solution from the answers in this thread and other sources. I like it because of the following reasons:

  • The standard name looks different, but it does not "stick out" too much.

  • Numbers and letters have the same height.

  • It is well readable.

However, the font face is not a standard font (e.g. ISO 3098). And the solution does not look good in every context. Maybe there will arrive more ideas or answers in this thread over time.

  • What do you mean by ugly? Have you tried small caps? \textsc{...}. Small caps are meant to used when a lot of capital letters appear cosecutively and you don't want them to stick out. – AJN Mar 15 '16 at 17:54
  • Ugly means, among other things, that letters and numbers do not have the same height. The font face should be a sans serif font. The appearance should indicate, that "DIN" and "103" belong together and form a unit. – ManuelAtWork Mar 16 '16 at 16:08
  • 1
    Did either of the answers help you at all? If so it is customary to at least upvote them, and perhaps pick one for as the answer. – A Feldman May 24 '16 at 14:16
1

From Wikipedia

Small caps are often used for sections of text that is all uppercase; this makes the run of capital letters seem less jarring to the reader.

Similarly for numbers see Old style figures

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts,amssymb,amsthm}

\begin{document}
Sometimes I am using names of standards, such as DIN 103.
Typing the name in plain text can make it look ugly.
Do you have any advice or experience?
Can you recommend a generic way that makes DIN EN 13001-3 look good?
Can you recommend a particular LaTeX standard font?
So far, I have been only adjusting spaces: DIN EN 13001-3
However, sometimes the numbers are smaller than the capital letters.
Related question: Do you have recommendations for setting names
of standard components, e.g. TR110x12?
So far, I am using Tr 110x12 but it sometimes looks cramped.

\bigskip
Sometimes I am using names of standards, such as \textsc{din 103}.
Typing the name in plain text can make it look ugly.
Do you have any advice or experience?
Can you recommend a generic way that makes \textsc{din en 13001-3} look good?
Can you recommend a particular \textsc{latex} standard font?
So far, I have been only adjusting spaces: \textsc{din en 13001-3}
However, sometimes the numbers are smaller than the capital letters.
Related question: Do you have recommendations for setting names
of standard components, e.g. \textsc{tr 110x12}?
So far, I am using \textsc{tr 110x12} but it sometimes looks cramped.
\end{document} 

small caps for running capital letters

| improve this answer | |
  • Good idea, but smallcaps don't work with my font. Based on your idea, I am suggesting: \newcommand{\std}[1]{{\fontfamily{pag}\selectfont\footnotesize\textbf{#1}}}% And then I use \std{DIN\,103}. What do you think? – ManuelAtWork Mar 16 '16 at 15:35
1

Something like this?

enter image description here

\documentclass[8pt,a4paper]{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{microtype}

\newfontfamily\csa{Dekar}

\newcommand{\abc}[1]{%
%   
    \begingroup\csa\footnotesize\textls[130]{#1}%
    \endgroup}

\begin{document}

    Hello Kitty \abc{DIN  103} by Sanrio.

\end{document}

And related, see this wonderful answer: Grouping and undefined control sequence error

| improve this answer | |
  • I like the approach, but the fontspec package requires xelatex or lualatex. At least that's what the error message says when compiling with latex or pdflatex. – ManuelAtWork May 31 '16 at 6:43
  • True, but lualatex is basically a pdflatex that understands the lua programming language. – A Feldman May 31 '16 at 12:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.