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I'm working on a document that has many short Greek passages in it, as well as single words and expressions. It is impractical to embrace all of those with \gr{...} (defined with \def\gr#1{{\otherlanguage{polutonikogreek}#1}}), both because it would be tedious and because it would be too easy to forget some, so I need a script to do this. The command should only be applied to Greek amongst English words, not to paragraphs containing only Greek (and TeX commands), for which an otherlanguage environment is more suitable. It should take into account that the Greek passages may contain punctuation and line breaks (hard wrapping). Here is a lipsum to try on. The Greek Unicode ranges are 0x0370--0x03FF and 0x1F00--0x1FFF. Many thanks in advance if anyone has a solution.

 Non eram  nescius, Brute,  cum, quae summis  ingeniis exquisitaque
 ἐπεὶ οὖν  ἄμφω doctrina  philosophi Graeco  sermone tractavissent,
 ea  Latinis  litteris mandaremus,  fore  ut  hic noster  labor  in
 varias κινήσεις  εἰ μὲν  ἕτεραι ἐν reprehensiones  incurreret. nam
 quibusdam, et iis quidem non admodum indoctis, totum hoc displicet
 philosophari. quidam  autem non tam id  reprehendunt, si remissius
 agatur, sed  tantum studium  τίνι ἢ  γὰρ, ἄμφω·  ἐν τῷ  πάσχοντι καὶ
 κινουμένῳ `ἢ ἡ  μὲν ποίησις' ἐν τῷ tamque multam  operam ponendam in
 eo  non arbitrantur.  erunt etiam,  et ii  quidem eruditi  Graecis
 litteris, contemnentes  Latinas, qui ποιοῦντι  ἡ δὲ πάθησις  ἐν τῷ
 πάσχοντι  se dicant  in Graecis  legendis operam  malle consumere.
 postremo  aliquos  futuros  suspicor,  qui me  ad  alias  litteras
 vocent, genus hoc  scribendi, etsi sit elegans,  personae tamen et
 dignitatis esse negent.

 Contra   quos    omnis   dicendum    breviter   existimo. Quamquam
 philosophiae quidem vituperatoribus satis  responsum est eo libro,
 (εἰ δὲ δεῖ καὶ ταύτην ποίησιν  καλεῖν ὁμώνυμος ἂν εἴη;) quo a nobis
 philosophia  defensa  et collaudata  est,  cum  esset accusata  et
 vituperata ab Hortensio. qui liber  cum et tibi probatus videretur
 et iis,  quos ego posse iudicare  arbitrarer, ἀλλὰ μὴν εἰ  τοῦτο ἡ
 plura suscepi  veritus ne movere hominum  studia viderer, retinere
 non posse. Qui autem,  si maxime hoc placeat,  moderatius tamen id
 volunt  fieri, difficilem  quandam temperantiam  postulant in  eo,
 κινοῦντι ἔσται  (ὁ γὰρ. αὐτὸς λόγος  quod semel  admissum coerceri
 reprimique non potest, ut propemodum iustioribus utamur illis, qui
 omnino avocent a  ἐπὶ κινοῦντος philosophia, quam  κίνησις ἐν his,
 qui rebus τῷ infinitis modum  constituant in reque eo meliore, quo
 maior sit, mediocritatem desiderent.

PS. A more precise description of what I desire: the equivalent of the following procedure: go to the next Greek character; see if what immediately precedes it is \gr{; if so, go to the matching } and repeat; else: insert \gr{; find the next Latin character; go back to the last Greek character; insert } after it. Repeat.

PS II. I am now using

#!/usr/bin/perl
binmode STDIN,  ":utf8";
binmode STDOUT, ":utf8";
my $g=qr/[\x{0370}-\x{03FF}\x{1F00}-\x{1FFF}]/;
my $L=qr/[^a-zA-Z]/;
while (<>)
{
    s/( (?: $g $L* $g) )/\\gr{$1}/xg;
  print
}

which must be called with the cmd-line option -0. this works fine except a minor aesthetic problem: the pattern doesn't know whether a bracket at the end of it belongs inside or not.

1

Here is your script. Simply pipe your content throught it. Add any other punctuation marks you may need to $p after the comma in [,].

#!/usr/bin/perl
binmode STDIN,  ":utf8";
binmode STDOUT, ":utf8";
my $g = qr/\p{Greek}/;
my $p = qr/[,]/;
while ( <> )
{
  s/( (?: ($g+$p*\s+$g+$p*\s*)+ | $g+$p* )+ )/\\gr{$1}/xg;
  print
}

Output:

 Non eram  nescius, Brute,  cum, quae summis  ingeniis exquisitaque
 \gr{ἐπεὶ οὖν  ἄμφω} doctrina  philosophi Graeco  sermone tractavissent,
 ea  Latinis  litteris mandaremus,  fore  ut  hic noster  labor  in
 varias \gr{κινήσεις  εἰ μὲν  ἕτεραι ἐν} reprehensiones  incurreret. nam
 quibusdam, et iis quidem non admodum indoctis, totum hoc displicet
 philosophari.
  • Thanks! I'm close to getting this to work, but there's still a problem with lines that have been commented out, because the script can leave some lines beginning with }%. – Toothrot Apr 6 '16 at 0:33
  • This produced an error, maybe you could put it into the answer, so I can see exactly how it is to be inserted. Also, it would be better if there were never any space or newline directly to the left of the right bracket (this would avoid the other problem too). – Toothrot Apr 6 '16 at 0:47
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    Like this: s/( (?: ($g+$p*\s+$g+$p*\s*)+ | $g+$p* )+ )/\\gr{$1}/xg unless /^}%/; – n.r. Apr 6 '16 at 0:49
  • I'm grateful for the answer, but I had to spend hours learning enough perl to correct it. Can't remember all details, but ended up using my $L=qr/[^a-zA-Z]/; undef $/; $_ = <>; s/( (?: $g $L* $g) )/\\gr{$1}/xg; I think your way didn't work accross lines and sometimes left a space at the end of a passage. – Toothrot Apr 28 '16 at 8:03
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    @Toothrot: You may use \p{Greek} instead of [\x{0370}-\x{03FF}\x{1F00}-\x{1FFF}]. – n.r. Aug 2 '16 at 23:41
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Use may write Unicode Greek directly with the alphabeta package.

\documentclass {article}
\usepackage [utf8]           {inputenc}
\usepackage [greek, english] {babel}
\usepackage                  {alphabeta}

\begin {document}

Text in Greek: τίνι ἢ  γὰρ, ἄμφω

\end {document}
  • Will this hyphenate Greek words correctly? – Toothrot Apr 5 '16 at 22:08
  • Are there hyphenation rules for Ancient Greek? – n.r. Apr 5 '16 at 22:09
  • Yes! I also need the font features to change. – Toothrot Apr 5 '16 at 22:12
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    @Lawrence Of course not: it will use the hyphenation rules for English. For instance you'd get κι-νοῦν-τος. With the polutonikogreek option and \foreignlanguage{greek}{κινοῦντος} you'd get κι-νο-ῦν-τος. – egreg Apr 5 '16 at 22:13
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    @Lawrence I don't know, it's all Greek to me. But it's clearly different from the hyphenation with proper segregation in \foreignlanguage. – egreg Apr 5 '16 at 22:24

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